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Waltari Celebrates 25 Years of Music

Finnish metal band Waltari recently celebrated their 25th anniversary as a band. Formed in 1986, they’ve become known in their careers as a band that excels at combining different styles of music, especially creating diverse and refreshingly open minded variations within rock and metal. So it was only natural that at their anniversary show at Nosturi in Helsinki, some of the areas diverse quantity of musicians within the Finnish musical community (and a few other from other areas! ) would be taking the stage to perform with these heroes of rock.

First up to take the stage was Lord Bishop of Lord Bishop Rocks. I cannot stress the diversity of this show enough, especially in the case of getting to hear this upbeat 70’s influenced rock. The charismatic Lord Bishop played well with the musicians of Waltari, and the effect was an intro to the night that spoke purely of the good times ahead.

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Vince Neil’s 11/11/11 Atlantic City Show

What better place to spend 11/11/11 than Atlantic City? Okay, maybe Las Vegas, Miami, etc… Anyway, we ended up in A.C. to test the gambling gods on the roulette table and have some fun. Last minute (a week prior) Motley Crue singer, Vince Neil, scheduled two solo shows for the night. This was never part of the original plan, but you know…when in Vegas (I mean Atlantic City): Go to the Vince Neil show. More...

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Testament Shines On National Metal Day

It was Veteran's Day, Friday, November 11, 2011 and a perfect fall day in New England. As if by fate, it was also National Metal Day. It started with Black Sabbath making it's return official - they wouldn't just reform, but create a new album and tour. The icing on this cake was the arrival of one of the most prolific tours that thrash metal could ever assemble: Death Angel, Testament and Anthrax. That is a staggering 84 years of combined metal experience in the building. This was three bands that defined a genre and still to this day put out material that is as relevant as the classics we all know them for.

The Palladium in Worcester, Massachusetts is a perfect place for an event like this, a haunted theater turned music club. The crowds come from all over New England and they are a knowledgeable metal crowd too. You don't get a lot of punks or wannabees or curious fake metal types. These crowds can rival those in European clubs, making this a location one that most bands play when in the area. Imagine an old style theater with the levels still there but seats removed, the rails of each level still present dividing the crowd. For shows of this caliber, the club opens the balcony section, which does have seating, however beaten and torn those seats may be. The view from this area is a unique one, providing a respite for those beaten in the pit and metalheads who are "heightenly challenged." The club had its years where it banned moshing, but fortunately they eased up and now really allow the crowd to be themselves within the realm of safety and the security team doesn't seem overly dickish. More...

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Wolves In The Throne Room Plays Helsinki

Wednesday was one of the coldest days we’ve had here in Helsinki this fall, and as people lined up outside to see Wolvserpent and Wolves in the Throne Room; their devotion showed as they patiently queued outside. There was an air of mystery as we filtered into the dark venue, and a feeling of relief when one was able to pass through the doors into the dark blue and amber lit room. Still people kept showing up, and fighting winters approach. Just a few minutes after Wolves in the Throne Room had started, rumors were it had sold out. More...

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Havok, Goatwhore, Exhumed Execute Well in Chicago

Everyone has gaps in their experience, even with things they love. I, for example, have never seen "Caddyshack," despite enjoying comedy films. So when the call came from HQ for me to cover the MetalUnderground.com sponsored North American tour of Exhumed, Goatwhore, and Havok, I was a little thrown – who were these bands and what did they play?

I knew a little of Goatwhore from various heavy metal publications, and Havok had been getting some good pub on MetalUnderground.com recently, but I knew little of their music. And Exhumed, a goregrind band from Northern California, had been completely off my radar up until now, as grind isn’t my bag. But I figured this was a good shot for completely unbiased show viewing. So I pulled on my man-pants, grabbed my helmet, and did this thing. More...

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Fun Fun Fun Fest 2011, Part 2

November 5th, 2011—Day two of Fun Fun Fun Fest exemplified Texas’ extreme weather conditions. Rare rains are great for picnics, but eventually raise havoc on the land. The hottest summer in the recorded history of the United States revealed an Auditorium Shores that resembled a Western ghost town rather than the green knolls of a public park.

Dust masks and bandanas veiled the features of the day’s attendees, giving the festival an appearance part Old West and part zombie-virus film. Those in attendance deserve credit for braving such abhorrent conditions. Weather conditions are beyond the control of Fun Fun Fun’s staff, although I can’t help but think something could have been done to curb the dust problem. No matter who was to blame for Friday’s short Misfit’s set, no controversies marred Saturday’s festivities.

A death metal bludgeoning assaulted my ears upon entering the venue. I asked myself, “Why would a comedy stage play host to a death/grind band?” I peeked around the corner to see this group was Captured By Robots. The one-man-several-robots group was part Mystery Science Theater 3K and part Gwar. Eyeballs and intestines protruded from front man JBOT, who carried on silly conversations with jean-jacket clad, double-necked guitar playing robot GTRBOT666. An ensemble of a disembodied, dreadlocked drummer, DRMBOT 0110 with a macabre brass section and “Monkey Shines” percussion kicked out a hilarious mix of punk, metal, grind, Dubstep and pop covers. Two of the more memorable songs include Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” and Buster Poindexter’s “Hot Hot Hot.” More...

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Fun Fun Fun Fest 2011, Part 1

Other than battling dust devils and a short Misfits set, Austin’s sixth annual Fun Fun Fun Fest lived up to its name in the variety of activities it offered to patrons. Local acts to artists from across the world graced four stages catering to a variety of music styles. Rap, metal, electronic, funk, punk were just a few of the genres covered. Those with narrow musical tastes benefited best due to the long walks between stages, especially from the entrance to the Black Stage that hosted most of the heavy acts.

While the music of Fun Fun Fun Fest took center stage, those who wanted to rest their ears could watch comedy and wrestling at the Yellow Stage. The festival’s layout resembled a carnival with tents and trailers serving up the best of local cuisine. Even though few wore the traditional Texas-cowboy garb, bar the handkerchiefs for dust relief, one could experience a simulated rodeo experience on the back of a mechanical bull. Other tents were a gateway to video games. The PIP and Media areas were a maze of mesh walls and tents that offered smaller beer and rest room lines. The media tent featured special interview areas containing an influx of celebrities. Bewildered continence graced the faces of those witnessing film crews follow around celebrities in the creation of who-knows-what type of productions. Academy Award nominee Ryan Gosling made camera-hawked, back-stage appearances.

Friday’s lineup offered little in the way of metal, so I spent much of this day exploring the festival and hanging out in the media tent. Blake Anderson, the long, curly-haired slacker on Comedy Central’s “Workaholics” approached the tent with a lover of some sort. I directed the two towards the Heineken beer tent. Decked out in a fake mullet and mustache, Sergio “The Sexy Sax Man” Flores also frequented the media tent. He was scheduled to serenade a wedding at the festival. Even though his sax only produces the romantic notes of George Michael, he confessed his love for metal. He told me a story bringing the brass to death metal when he joined his friends The Faceless on stage. He dove into the crowd, creating fireplace harmonies before accidentally falling and cracking his head on the floor. More...

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Metalheim Festival 2011

The week leading up to Metalheim festival was taut with anticipation, and excitement. The festival is hosted by the wonderful people at Metalheim Productions and takes place in two cities, Helsinki and Oulu. Each day featured five bands, and they travel between the two cities so we all partake in the epicness of the tour.

This year’s agenda boasted a fantastic lineup both days. Naturally, the week dragged on and on; and with a brand new Canon eos just waiting to be used, it felt like eternity until Friday. I finally arrived at Nosturi, and was lucky indeed to be able to interview Ville Sorvali of Moonsorrow, and later met with Kari, Gunnar and Terji of Tyr. Read the interview with Ville Sorvali here, others coming soon! More...

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Anthrax Led Thrashing Tour of Year in Austin

Anthrax’s Big 4 thrashin’ glory had not graced the halls of Texas’ capital since joining Pantera in 1997. During the last fourteen years, Austin’s avid devotees to the cult of NOT were forced to travel the hour-plus journey to find their selves “Caught in a Mosh.” This last appearance was the “American Carnage” tour with Slayer and Megadeth during the summer of 2010—the same lineup as the “Clash of the Titans” tour in 1991. Tonight’s lineup may not have featured three of the Big 4 thrash icons, but with Second Wave thrash staples, Testament and Death Angel, this tour surely featured enough neck-wrecking force to wear the “Clash of the Titans” title.

While there was no shortage of banging heads, the evening could have stocked up on banging bodies. Sure, Anthrax put the crowd in motion a number of times, but the place wasn’t a “Madhouse” like the footage relayed from their 1980s performances. The concert hall was vast enough that pits would have evaded my eyes, but I don’t recall seeing any significant movement during Death Angel, and the pit widened when Anthrax took the stage with “Earth on Hell,” but the circle shrank after the first track. Of course, their classic war-dance breakdown during “Indians” and closer “I Am the Law” instigated more rowdiness.

Stage diving wasn’t allowed, so there is no meter for that activity, but the fans from Anthrax’s popularity peak in the late eighties to early nineties are twenty years older and no longer possess that teen angst. Even though plenty of younger fans showed up, they either weren't in force like their older fans or just didn’t bring the energy like the thrashers of yesteryear. Testament never seemed like a mosh band, at least that’s what the crowd’s actions stated in every show I’ve seen. Here, fans wore out vocal chords instead of lungs and limbs.

The doors opened around 7 and Death Angel took the stage around 8. Guitarist Rob Cavestany is the sole remainder of the Filipino cousins that started the group. Mark Osegueda still grips the mic, so the core of the band is still intact. Osegueda commanded the stage, assuming bold stances during spot-on vocal performances. Like the writhing snakes forming Medusa’s hair, Osegueda’s dreads took on a life of their own during hard-driven musical breaks. The mix could have been clearer, but the group played passionately and Osegueda’s voice was in top form. Their half-hour set catered to a wide expanse of material, which climaxed with “Thrown to the Wolves” from the 2004 album “The Art of Dying.”

Death Angel left the stage, but would return to the stage when Testament wished Rob Cavestany a happy birthday. The Testament crew brought out a cake and Chuck Billy led the crowd in singing happy birthday.

Much like Death Angel, fellow California Bay Area act, Testament took a long hiatus due to Chuck Billy’s health issues. Since releasing “The Formation of Damnation,” Testament has been on a tear. Having joined Megadeth and Exodus on the “Rust in Peace” 20th Anniversary tour, this would mark their second consecutive year in Austin. The Megadeth tour worked on the theme of classic albums—Megadeth performed all of “Rust in Peace,” while Testament unpacked “The Legacy.” Because Testament devoted most of their time to “The Legacy,” the group didn’t offer much in terms of new material. Tonight’s set list focused more on new material.

Even though “The Formation of Damnation” was one of the comeback albums of the decade, and the group showcased some of its best songs such as “More Than Meets the Eye,” the fans came to hear classic material. “Into the Pit,” “The Haunting,” “Envy Life” and essential “Souls of Black” got the nostalgia factor flowing. “Electric Crown” was an expected surprise from the overlooked and underrated “The Ritual” album. The ballad-heavy and flashier style turned off many fans and was Alex Skolnick’s swan song until his recent return. However, this was arguably Billy’s best vocal performance. “3 Days of Darkness” and “D.N.R. (Do not Resuscitate)” recalled material from one of the highlights of the ‘90s—“The Gathering.”

Watching Gene Hoglan (ex-Strapping Young Lad, Fear Factory) play the Dave Lombardo drum rhythms of “The Gathering,” was surely a treat, and "Gene Gene The Drum Machine" was up to task. It was also a treat seeing the return of Alex Skolnick from the group’s initial lineup. The white-stripped, black-haired guitarist showed why he is considered one of the world’s great guitar shredders. He played no Christmas music tonight (probably saving that for December), just slick leads and brawny riffs. Although Chuck Billy voice was nothing short of monstrous and his onstage banter, often standing next to Hoglan on his elevated platform, stirred up the electricity in the audience. Even though he never sold me on his mic-stand-air-guitar technique, his glowing, moble mic stand related a cool Star Wars effect during dark interludes.

Following cue from Testament and Death Angel, Anthrax opened with a barrage of new hits. Also, like their predecessors, the new material was great but fans came out to for the oldies. Chorus-charged songs “The Devil You Know” and “I’m Alive” were an indicator of Joey Belladonna’s voice. Questions were in abundance regarding Belladonna’s return. He had been absent for nearly twenty years. All these questions were put to rest. Classic songs “Indians” and “Metal Thrashing Mad” were tests of range and he passed with an A (for anarchy). He devoted the later track to die-hards who were there since the “Fistful of Metal” early days. This track was a bit of a surprise, seems how the group rerecorded and released a video for “Deathrider.”

The biggest surprise of Anthrax’s set was a cover of Sepultura’s “Refuse Resist.” Using the comedic wit that characterizes Anthrax, Scott Ian introduced the song by saying, “This is something we’ve been working on.” Belladonna joined Benante at the drum kit, hitting the snare and recreating the tribal vibe of the original.

More madness came in the form of “Madhouse” from the “Spreading the Disease” album. The audience tested their voices on “State of Euphoria” essentials “Be All End All” and “Antisocial.” The group represented “Persistence of Time” with their rendition of Joe Jackson’s “Got the Time.” They put a spotlight on “Among the Living,” their breakout record, playing “Efilnikufesin (N.F.L.)” as a second encore and ending with expected closer “I am the Law.”

The show started with poor sound, but was soon rectified. Those bemoaning the closing of Emo’s downtown soon forgot about the club upon hearing the superior sound and seeing the massive stage of Emo’s East. Emo’s East destroyed Emo’s in every regard except the east side “EAST SIIIDE” location. Testament and Anthrax battled for the best performance of the night, which is a tough call because both bands played hard. Both singers were pitch-perfect—Belladonna is clearly the best singer of the Big 4. He was back in the group’s height of popularity and he is now. Don’t expect to see another Dan Nelson mess anytime soon!

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Chthonic: The Final Battle At Sing Ling Temple

The ornate and historic Sing Ling Temple, located on a hillside in the scenic mountain town of Puli in Nantou County, Central Taiwan, played host to Taiwan’s top extreme metal band, Chthonic, this past Saturday. The temple is of special historical significance to Taiwan, as it was the site of a battle between Taiwanese troops and KMT soldiers following the 228 incident, in which many thousands of Taiwanese were massacred by the KMT over 40 years ago. Chthonic has since made the temple, along with local folklore and the Taiwanese fight for recognition of their independence, a central focus of their music and lyrics.

Fans began lining up hours in advance of the concert’s 6:30 p.m. start time, climbing the steep hillside steps leading up to the bright orange thatched roofs and delicate masonry of the temple proper to the staging area just behind it. A film crew, documenting the concert for a future DVD release, lugged hundreds of kilograms of gear, including a large swing-arm camera that dipped and dove over the heads of the fans throughout the show, up the stairs in temperatures that reached an unseasonably high 30 degrees plus.

Crew members, international music press from around Asia and Europe, including a representative of Metal Hammer magazine (UK), and a few lucky friends and fans looked on as Chthonic battled and overcame sound problems early on during their sound check. Special guest vocalist, the affable and approachable Randy Blythe (Lamb of God), lounged in the shade of a ring of trees surrounding the staging area, clad in a black Misfits T-shirt, wraparound shades, backwards baseball cap, and camouflage shorts, awaiting his call to the huge steel stage constructed for the occasion. The stage came complete with poly casts of huge stone sculptures of mythical beasts usually found guarding the front gates of temples in Taiwan, and a large backdrop featuring the Chthonic logo, all designed by local artist, photographer and art teacher Oink Chen. More...

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Black Dahlia Murder Jam Packs Small Austin Club

The dark, dank halls of Red 7 summoned the youthful masses to see two leading groups of today’s breakdown-heavy metal scene. Speaking of dank, weed grinding death metallers, Cannabis Corpse complimented The Black Dahlia’s core-meets-death sound with a more traditional, Florida death metal offering. Although Red 7 didn’t overcrowd the bill with locals—The Black Dahlia Murder, All Shall Perish and Cannabis Corpse were afforded long set times—a lone local band warmed up the PA system. I didn’t catch this group’s name nor can I “breakdown” their performance. What I can say, though, is their bouncy, burlesque sound proved the ideal style for the night’s lime-lighted acts.

In the case of Red 7’s lighting system, the colored-coded adage listed above denotes strict figurative usage. Fluorescent light bulbs could have been a fitting source of light for Cannabis Corpse and equally illuminated the group. The stoners blazing blunts at the front of the stage meant even lesser light for photography. Those out of range from smelling the sweet leaf might have thought, “Wow, they’re using dry ice! Nice fog effect!” Rolling audio brutality into symmetrically shaped jibs, the Virginia-based band force-fed the crowd a meal of slamming grooves, katana-bladed guitar tones and slick bass solos.

Andy 'Weedgrinder' Horn pushed out screams owing to George Fisher’s vile-natured highs and Chris Barnes indecipherable lows. Instead of utilizing known fill-in words such Tom G. Warrior’s famous “Heeey” or Rob Zombies “Yeaaah,” Weedgrinder threw out quick, fitting phrases such as “get high.” Led by the Hall brothers--Municipal Waste bassist, Phil “Landphil” Hall and drummer Josh 'HallHammer' Hall, the quartet’s frenetic head banging super-charged Mary Jane horror film scenarios songs. “Blazing” through material from such Cannibal Corpse parodied albums as “Tubes of the Resonated” and “Blunted at Birth,” set highlights included “Sentenced to Burn One,” “Dead by Bong” and set closer “Skull Full of Bong Hits.” More...

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Goatwhore Celebrates "Reign In Blood"

Just northwest of New Orleans is our capital city of Baton Rouge. Lately, they’ve been getting plenty of good metal shows like Crowbar, Thou, and now Goatwhore, who played a special set for this this show. Four bands came together to celebrate the 25th anniversary of one of the cornerstone albums of the metal world; Slayer’s album "Reign in Blood" which was released October 7th, 1986. To add to the festivities, there was Slayer cookie cake and I made some slain cupcakes with fondant knives piercing the spicy chocolate cupcakes that bled strawberry syrup. Confections aside, the show was more like a party than a concert. Even some regular New Orleans folk made the trek out for the occasion. I was able to film Goatwhore’s set which can be seen in two parts below. More...

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Amorphis Plays Sold Out Show In Helsinki

When I woke up on Friday morning I knew it was going to be a fantastic day, regardless of the pouring rain, and the new found hole in my only unpacked shoes. After all, it is not often that one has the privilege of being able to attend a sold out Amorphis show at Helsinki’s historic venue, Nosturi. The venue is in an old cargo building, atmospherically located right on the sea. Truly, a perfect place for the mythic Kalevalan inspired music of Finnish metal heroes, Amorphis.

The air is tense as I walk up to the dark building; people are lined up in a queue that stretches from the doors of the venue all the way down to the docks where black water churns ominously. Some people arrive at the door only to realize the sign proudly proclaims “Sold Out!” They mutter “Vittu! Perkele! or Saatana!” (essential Finnish Phrases! ) and dejectedly walk away. More...

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Kyuss Lives! Again in Austin

Edgar Allen Poe died broke and mad—his creative genius never realized until after his death. It seems Kyuss’ influence wasn’t felt until after its demise. Fortunately for the group, these desert rockers didn’t have to literally die to make an impact. Sixteen years after disbanding, Kyuss has returned and judging by the massive gathering inside Stubb’s 2,000-plus-capacity amphitheater, their popularity has snowballed during this time.

I have nothing for comparison because I didn’t catch Kyuss during the first part of the nineties—their active years. If the few patrons I spoke to were a microcosm of the Kyuss live experience, most of the thirty-something crowd were also unable to catch them the first time around. Waiting fifteen years and wishing the group would get back together may be cause for such a large gathering, but the group’s status as the forerunners of the stoner rock movement, a hot trend in the modern rock scene, probably has something to do with the turnout.

The popularity of Josh Homme’s bands, Queens of the Stone Age and Them Crooked Vultures may have also led many to hear Homme’s trademark guitar play in Kyuss. This would explain, in part, the large number of younger fans. Some of these youngsters came with their parents, as seen by the fans standing next to us. Homme wasn’t on hand and the group came out as Kyuss Lives!, but this didn’t seem to affect attendance numbers or crowd reaction.

New comers MonstrO warmed up an unassuming crowd. Consisting of Torche, Danzig and ex-Blood Simple members, these Georgians (and one Floridian) were a good fit for Kyuss Lives! stoner rockin’ style. Performing in front of the headliner’s backdrop, which depicted a silhouette of a hawk or raven soaring in the shadow of a multi-hued sun, MonstrO kicked out six or seven tunes of a varying nature.

Bevan Davies' drum play produced a big thud. It’s no wonder he has pounded skins for Danzig. The group’s grainy guitar sound brought to mind Kyuss, an influence bassist Kyle Sanders made known during an interview prior to the show.

Some of MonstO’s songs referenced early nineties grunge, ala Soundgarden and Alice in Chains. The song “Pyro” related an obvious Alice in Chains groove (William DuVall of Alice in Chains produced their current, debut album), while Charlie Suarez nailed down the melodious, skyward voice of Chris Cornell. MonstrO didn’t bring down the house, but their half-hour performance surely gained them a bigger fan base. More...

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Opeth and Katatonia Play To Music City

Their latest and most polarizing album, “Heritage,” just released to the world (and reviewed here,) Opeth began their fall North American tour with support from the well-established Katatonia. One of the first shows was in Nashville, TN just this Wednesday, the 28th, and the crowd didn’t react as divided as the internet let on that it would. The Cannery Ballroom turned out to be the perfect size for the show, with the crowd filling up all the way to the back.

Both bands had a very passionate crowd, eager to find a spot and keep it the entire show. When Katatonia came on, they walked out to fairly loud cheers, kicking things off with their concoction of chugging and atmospherics. During the set, the band was bathed in a dark red crimson light, with only faint hues of blue lights hitting them from the front, mixing with the music to make for an altogether dark experience. More...

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Opeth Stops By Philadelphia For A Sold-Out Show

Opeth’s latest album “Heritage” has divided the band's fan base in a way not seen since 2003 with “Damnation,” and even back then, it never got as heated as some of the discussions on “Heritage” going off in various forums, blogs, and web sites. With Opeth’s 10th studio album released just a few days prior, the band made a stop in rain-soaked Philadelphia on the first U.S. headlining tour in support of “Heritage.” With fellow Swedish act Katatonia as direct support, the Trocadero was sold-out for the show. What fans got was from both bands was a few solid hits and a mellow atmosphere that caught many off-guard. More...

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Wolves In The Throne Room Destroys Philadelphia

When Wolves In The Throne Room entered the tiny stage in the basement of Broad Street Ministry in Philadelphia on Thursday, September 15, a newfound sense of anticipation filled the suffocating air. The room became packed, like a busload of metal heads were suddenly dropped off outside the church just a few minutes prior. The smoke from the stage sucked out the oxygen, giving off a sudden wave of heat that resulted in heavy sweating and panting. The first notes of “Thuja Magus Imperium” echoed through the amps, and what transpired was an hour of gripping black metal that mingled well with the three other acts on the card. More...

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ProgPower USA XII: Day Two

If you attend Progpower, make sure you opt for the VIP gold badge over the regular. This will get you in to the “Insider Sale” where you will be able to purchase CDs of all of the bands that will be playing at next year’s festival. Gold badge attendees this year were treated to this sale in the vendor room long before the doors opened to regular attendees. Among the CDs on sale were some albums that previously had not received a US distribution, such as Amaranthe's debut.

When the doors finally opened, everyone was eager to get in and out of the bright Atlanta sun for another twelve hours. Being such an exclusive event, you could instantly strike up a conversation with any stranger you meet and be on the same page. With social barriers down, everyone was talking with everyone, discussing albums, bands, and previous ProgPower festivals.

UK-based progressive-symphonic band Haken was first up for the day, though the place was only half full about ten minutes before the band’s set. Clearly, the after-parties of the night before had been great. The venue eventually filled up in time for Haken’s second song. It was to be an exciting set, although a bit short. Seeing guitarists Richard Henshall and Charles Griffiths, as well as keyboardist Diego Tejeida rip some masterful solos did the trick on kicking hangovers from the night before. More...

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ProgPower USA XII: Day One

Friday began early in the day for the ProgPower crowd when US-based Creation’s End took the stage at around 2:40. Italian Guitarist Marco Sfogli got the crowd warmed up with some serious movement on his fretboard. Rhythm guitarist Rudy Albert and bassist Joe Black pulled on their best game faces for the early crowd. Vocalist Mike DiMeo had a nice stage presence and belted it out there. The set was a bit short, but as an opener, it had to be. Nevertheless, the band opened the day well without a hitch.

After the band wrapped its set, the reunited US band Sanctuary, featuring Warrell Dane and Jim Sheppard from Nevermore, was immediately in the lobby for a signing. Unfortunately, the band schedule and the signing schedule (both published in the very cool ProgPower program book given to attendees) did not see eye to eye. The bands reached a half-hour to forty-five minutes behind schedule throughout the day, so the signing sessions often took place during a band’s set. This made for tough decisions like: “Do I stay through the end of Voyager’s set or do I go get Ihsahn’s autograph?”

Darkwater had taken the stage shortly after. The Swedish group was well-received and performed their variety of progressive melodic metal to a crowd that obviously appreciated, judging by their reaction to Evergrey the night before. The band had an aesthetic that begged to be watched closely as the purple lights fell on them for certain songs. Just after, I met with Red Circuit’s keyboardist, Marcus Teske, for an interview in the adjacent club, Vinyl. For the ProgPower show, Vinyl was converted into a merchandise room with everything a progressive fan could want. I was to go broke a few hours later because of this. More...

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ProgPower USA XII: Kick-Off Day

For the long-running USA metal festival, ProgPower USA, metalheads typically have no problems driving or flying from all across the country. Where else can you see sixteen mostly international bands, all of whom are pushing their own abilities and the boundaries of metal, over a two-day period? Now in its twelfth year, ProgPower takes place in Atlanta, Georgia at the Center Stage venue. Run by Glenn Harveston, who is first and foremost a fan, the festival spans the days of Friday and Saturday, September 16th and 17th, but officially kicked off on Thursday. The Swedish band Evergrey also performed an all-acoustic show at The Loft on Wednesday.

The show lineup, as announced on ProgPowerUSA.com, is as follows:

Thursday - Powerglove, Vanden Plas, Evergrey
Friday - Creation's End, Darkwater, Voyager, Eldritch, Mob Rules, Ihsahn, Sanctuary
Saturday - Haken, While Heaven Wept, Red Circuit, Labyrinth, Forbidden, Therion

On Thursday morning, I had packed and left Nashville, TN, driving four hours to get down to Atlanta, which was further away than I thought. Upon reaching the venue, I was instantly impressed. Center Stage has air conditioning, several bar areas, a spacious interior, and seats as well as a pit area. By metal’s standards, this was the music venue equivalent of a Four Seasons hotel. I met with Swedish melodic metal kings Evergrey for a very entertaining interview before the show. Immediately after, I also met with the well-spoken and well-trained video-game metal iconoclasts, Powerglove.

During sound check, the speakers in the lobby were playing what was coming off of the sound board, which meant that guests checking in or buying tickets were treated to Evergrey and Vanden Plas warming up. The Evergrey sneak preview was definitely notable, because the band was warming up material from their album, “In Search of Truth,” which they were to play through from start to finish in their first set. This was the first time they had done such a set, and as I learned in the interview, not expected to be done again in the near future. More...

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