"some music was meant to stay underground..."

Archive: Columns

Displaying records 521 - 540 of 1,281 1 2 ... 25 26 27 28 29 ... 64 65 Last

Sunday Old School: Melvins

Thriftway is a small grocery store chain here in Washington, one I stop at a couple of times a week for laundry soap or soda. Whenever I'm in the store I can't help but remember that this is where the Melvins got its start. Back in the early eighties, three teens from Montesano High School worked at a Thriftway store over in Greys Harbor County, WA. They despised their shift supervisor, whose name was Melvin. They even named their garage band after him, cranking out the slowest and most wretched riffs to ever hit the alternative rock/early indie metal scene. More...

Read more...  |  2 Comments - Discuss

Unearthing The Los Angeles Death Metal Scene

Every week we take a look at 3 unsigned bands that stand out from the crowd in our Unearthing the Metal Underground column. This week we take a look at the Los Angeles, California death metal scene.

Having recently moved to Los Angeles from New York, I was very impressed with the scene here. Promoters treating bands with respect and aggressively promoting their shows, grass roots marketing, bands helping each other out, everyone staying to hear every band at every show, and of course tons of talent. Of all the shocks I saw, it was the blending of scenes. There are shows with all genres of metal from brutal death, metalcore, thrash, traditional, and even some hard rock/metal cross over bands. The crowds love them all. The music is heavy and the bands are talented, what more do you need?

Today I am going to focus on three of the death metal bands I've come across from the Whittier area of Los Angeles: Syrebris, Insentient, and Infinite Death. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Sunday Old School: Forbidden

Of all the metal scenes across the world, the eighties thrash metal scene in California is probably of the most well known, having produced such big names as Metallica and Megadeth. It’s been some time since we examined a band from the scene, so this week, Sunday Old School will be taking a look at Forbidden, one of the heaviest and most daring bands from the Bay Area. Forbidden was formed in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1985, originally under the moniker Forbidden Evil, by guitarist Rob Flynn and drummer Jim Pittman, who quickly joined forces with vocalist Russ Anderson, bassist John Tegio and another guitarist, Craig Loicicero. The quintet made a live record entitled, "Live at Ruthies Inn – The Eastern Front" before Tegio, Pittman and Flynn all left the band, (the last of whom would join Vio-Lence before going on to form Machine Head,) and their places were taken by Matt Camacho, Paul Bostaph and Glen Avelais respectively.

This new incarnation of the band decided to shorten their name to Forbidden, as they were afraid that the name Forbidden Evil would stereotype them as a black metal outfit. They soon signed to Combat Records, home of such other thrash contemporaries as Heathen and Nuclear Assault and in 1988, they released their first full length album, "Forbidden Evil." The record was a hit with critics and thrash metal fans alike and has since gone on to be considered one of the true classics in the genre and featured a number of songs that have become live staples such as "Chalice of Blood" and "Through Eyes of Glass," as well as the title track. More...

Read more...  |  5 Comments - Discuss

The Rockstar Ramblings: Tribute Edition

This week a tribute to Guns N’ Roses, eighties hair, and David Lee Roth’s version of California; a few guitars are mixed in as well. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Pit Stories: No Good Deed Goes Unpunished

Every week we check in with fans and musicians to get their favorite Pit Stories. Today guitarist Ed Hartwell from Heart In Hand tells the following story about courteous moshers lending a helping hand...and wishing they hadn't:

This was not at a metal or hardcore show, but I think that makes it even funnier. A couple of years ago I went to see The Foo Fighters at the Milton Keynes Bowl and during one of their "mosh pits" (I use the term as loosely as possible) it became apparent that a pretty fat guy had fallen and was in a lot of pain. I think he had broken or sprained his foot from teeny bopping or something.

The crowd around him adopted the 'all for one and one for all' safety mentality which is usually the case at shows and helped lift him up to the barrier. It took a lot of force cos of his size. At this point a few people had noticed that he'd shit himself and it was coming out his shorts.

Of course they immediately tried to get away, but of course couldn't due to the sheer density of the crowd. It was too late and their heroic good samaritan deeds were rewarded by being horribly traumatized, as a big shitty guy tumbled over their heads. I was about 3 metres from the incident so luckily had a good enough view without getting any fecal matter on me whilst I enjoyed "Monkey Wrench."

Heart in Hand's second album "Almost There" is due out May 13th via Siege Of Amida Records. The band will be touring the U.K. and Europe over the summer and making various festival appearances. For more info on the band, head over to the Heart In Hand Facebook profile. More...

Read more...  |  1 Comment - Discuss

Unearthing The Maltese Metal Underground

Each week in Unearthing the Metal Underground, we'll be putting a few quality underground bands in the spotlight in an attempt to get the word out about them. This week, I take on the small, but strong Maltese metal scene.

When one thinks Malta, the first thought that comes to mind is a gorgeous tourist destination rich in Greek, Roman and Arabic culture situated between Italy and North Africa. The Maltese metal scene is a much smaller than other island nations like Cyprus, but it is a strong and hard working underground scene. Though bands are not denied the right to play music they want in this free nation, metal in Malta is typically shunned by the typically close minded culture of the nation and the sheer lack of venues that would have them. Some Maltese bands have been welcomed abroad to mainland Europe and the U.K., though the costs for many are too high. However, the country does have its own metal festivals: the Extreme Maltese Metal and Xtreme Metal Assault festivals held in the summer as well as the “M.D.M.” (Malta Doom Metal) held in November in the city of Rabat.

Some Maltese acts have either made it beyond the Mediterranean to tour Europe and the UK, or at the very least been heard worldwide, but still remain largely underground. Today, we will look at three of those acts: Forsaken, Loathe and Weeping Silence. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Sunday Old School: White Lion

It may be a stretch to call an eighties hair band that sold millions of records underrated, but look closely: White Lion fits the profile. Despite going all-in with a glam look and cheese-filled videos, there was actual music being played. Listen to the guitars and drums, and for heaven’s sake, don’t look directly into their eyes! More...

Read more...  |  3 Comments - Discuss

The Rockstar Ramblings: An Ode to New York City

This week a blast; a blast back to the punk Lower East Side neighborhood of New York via Sweden, an AC/DC inspired rocker, and an anti-cure for depression. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Sunday Old School: D.R.I.

Crossover thrash is an interesting genre, one whose stalwarts stories often begin with them forming as a hardcore outfit and bringing in metal influences as time went by and this week's featured band, Dirty Rotten Imbeciles are no exception. Dirty Rotten Imbeciles (or D.R.I. as they commonly known,) were formed in the Texas city of Houston on the 2nd of May 1982 by vocalist Kurt Brecht, his brother Eric on drums, bass player Dennis Johnson and guitarist, Spike Cassidy, who was the only one of the founding D.R.I. members not to have been a part of the hardcore band, Suburbanites. They performed their first gig exactly two months after forming and four months later, made their first record, the "Dirty Rotten EP," which featured twenty two songs but lasted only eighteen minutes. The EP was very well received and demand for the 7" led the band to re-releasing the effort as a 12" record, under the title, "Dirty Rotten LP." In order to advance in the emerging hardcore punk scene, the group relocated to San Francisco, California, where they reportedly faced many hardships, living in their van and resorting to eating at soup kitchens. The hard living was too much for Johnson, and he decided to return home to Texas, his place being taken by Sebastion Amok before the band secured a fairly high profile slot on the "Rock Against Reagan" tour, supporting the Dead Kennedys. Amok was sacked after the tour and replaced by Josh Pappe.

Pappe made his recording debut with the band on their next EP, "Violent Pacification," which featured four songs and once again earned a positive reception. After touring in support of the record, Eric Brecht decided to leave the band, owing in part to his recent marriage and his place behind the kit was taken by Felix Griffin. The next year, the band recorded and released their second full length record, "Dealing With It," which featured a sound moving noticeably closer to metal, though it was essentially still a hardcore album. It included the song, "Couch Slouch," which had previously featured on the “Violent Pacification” EP, as well as the opening tracks, "Snap" and "I'd Rather Be Sleeping," which would be covered by New York thrash legends, Anthrax the next decade. They were once again forced into finding a new bassist when Pappe decided to leave the band following extensive touring, with Offenders bass player, Mikey Offender chosen as his replacement. In recognition of the heavy touring the band had undertaken, they released their first home video, "Live at the Olympic" in 1986, which was filmed in Los Angeles. More...

Read more...  |  6 Comments - Discuss

The Rockstar Ramblings: Guns N' Roses 3D

Guns N' Roses have released a trailer for their upcoming 3D concert movie titled "Appetite For Democracy." The concert was shot during the bands Appetite For Democracy residency at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas last year. Per the trailer, Guns N' Roses turned "Sin City" into "Paradise City." For those who just cringed, here are a few other thoughts on the movie trailer... More...

Read more...  |  11 Comments - Discuss

Pit Stories: Helloween Hanky Panky

The pit: a convergence of metal heads and outlet for built-up aggression. Everybody’s got a pit story, and each week we share the favorites from metal musicians covering the entire spectrum of the underground and the mainstream.

A few weeks back vocalist Eric Dow of Helsott shared a story about Pantera stopping a show due to a lack of pit mayhem, and today Eric again gives a tale of pit shenanigans, but this time of a very different variety.

The following story comes from an interview at the 70,000 Tons of Metal Cruise with our own writer CROMCarl, in which Eric discusses love birds getting swept away by the sexy tunes of Helloween.

Eric: I was in the pit and they weren’t doing very much moshing or anything, but they were dancing around, having a good time. It was a pretty good crowd. All the sudden, I hear ‘Uh [in a female voice], Uh [in a male voice]’ and I turn around and some dude is fucking this chick right behind me….in the pit! I’m like what the fuck!

CROMCarl: Who was on stage at the time?

Eric: Uh, Helloween.

CROMCarl: Remember what they were playing?

Eric: Uhhhhhh… No [laughs all around]. Ugh…if I can try to remem…no. The fucking thing really fucking threw me off. No, no, no….I remember! “If I Could Fly!” Andy Deris fucked it up, I remember that. He fucked it up…I got these guys fucking behind me…Andy Deris fucked it up and he just rolled his eyes on stage like “I can’t believe I fucked up our most simple song.” That was great.

They were in the back of the pit. It’s a smaller venue and I know there was probably at least five or six people having the same “what the fuck” reaction. I’ve never seen that before…I’ve seen sex at concerts in plenty of places, but right there in a small venue in the mosh pit. You know…the lights all hitting them and shit..and nobody…the security guards were maybe twenty feet from them…didn’t do anything. I was like “alright, this is fucking Santa Ana, California.”

You can catch Helsott live on the remaining dates of the Paganfest tour this month, or find more info on the band via Facebook. Be sure to check back in again next week for more Pit Stories!

0 Comments - Discuss

Unearthing The Greek Metal Underground

A couple of months ago, I wrote a column examining three metal bands from Turkey, the country which bridges Europe and Asia, and a conversation was struck wherein I mentioned the idea of checking out some of the underground metal music that Turkey’s neighbours, Greece have to offer. Greece is certainly one of the most fascinating countries in Europe, if not the world, owing to its ancient history, philosophers, contributions to science, maths and politics and mythology, and it’s a place that enjoys heavy metal music too. Some of the more significant Greek metal bands around today include Rotting Christ, Firewind and SepticFlesh, but this week we will uncover three bands which aren’t as well known.

Suicidal Angels

Of all the bands featured this week, Suicidal Angels are probably the most well known, having worked extremely hard over the past few years to spread their brand of thrash metal. The group was formed in the Greek capital city of Athens in 2001 by singing guitarist, Nick Melissourgos and eventually recorded their first full length album, "Eternal Domination" in 2007, which was released in July of that year. The record did well enough to gain them a place supporting such thrash legends as Overkill, Kreator and Onslaught. The release of their second album, "Sanctify the Darkness" further solidified their place as one of the best young thrash metal acts around, and led them to more appearances with high profile artists, as well as slots at such festivals as Sonisphere and Wacken Open Air. The band has since released two more full length records, the most recent of which, "Bloodbath," hit the shelves last year.

Suicidal Angels - "Apokathilosis"
More...

Read more...  |  1 Comment - Discuss

Sunday Old School: Jag Panzer

While the cities in New York, Florida and the Bay Area drove the early power/thrash independent music scene in the early eighties, another legendary U.S. band came to prominence far up in the Rocky Mountains. A group of musicians who knew each other since the second grade started their own band in homage to the European scene, calling themselves Tyrant before learning of the L.A. and German bands of the same name. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

The Rockstar Ramblings: Porn Surfing and Beer

This week we have videos set in a church, a barn, and Oktoberfest. Pour yourself a tall boy, lock your doors, and prepare for a spiritual journey. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Pit Stories: Failed Festival Backflip

Every week Metalunderground.com checks in with musicians and fans to get their most memorable Pit Stories. Today, drummer Will Green from Ohio act Set to Reflect shares the following story about an unfortunate fan failing to pull of a back flip during a Burden of a Day set at the Cornerstone festival:

July 2nd, 2009. It was the most humid 105 degree Illinois day I'd ever lived through, and being smashed together between the 20,000 people at Cornerstone festival was not helping the already over-heated situation. I noticed one extremely lanky, yet absurd kid as I stood on the edge of the pit and watched everyone throw down to Burden of a Day. He was pulling out all the moves. Picking up the change, Windmills, spin kicks... you name it, he was performing it. The band's fantastic live presence only escalated the energy in the pit, and by midway through the show, he was acting more insane than anyone I've seen to this day. That was when it happened...

The next thing I know, the kid is jumping near the edge of the stage and doing a back-flip off... at least, half of a back-flip. As he landed awkwardly, you could see the bone pop out of his leg. His shin acted as if it were a third knee, and the look of shock on his face said it all. It was apparent that no one there had ever seen anything so gruesome in real life, as it took a full minute for anyone to come to his aid due to the immediate surprise of what had just occurred.

Once we were done lifting him and helping him to the outskirts of the tent, the paramedics arrived and carted him off. The image, however, is forever burned into my memory.

Set to Reflect's latest EP "A New Path To Walk On" is out now through Standby Records. For more info on the band, head over to the Set to Reflect Facebook profile here.

Check back in next Tuesday for more mosh pit stories, and let us know your favorite story from a live show in the comments below.

0 Comments - Discuss

Unearthing More Genre Flip-Floppers

With more than 15,000 bands in our database, and hordes more than that in existence, every Monday we like to take a little time to highlight three underground bands that deserve your attention.

Usually our unearthed bands focus on a single sub-genre or geographic region, but today we’ll look bands that have all experienced a similar phenomena: the flip-flop. Favored maneuver of politicians everywhere, and for some reason also plenty of metal bands, these guys aren’t doing it to pick up more votes, as their flip-flips frequently cost them fans.

Metal has its fair share of musical flip-floppers who went from heavy to soft, vice versa, or smashed opposing elements together to create a different type of sound. Our previous look at three genre flip-floppers covered a variety of them, and there are even more well known acts that have taken this route, from Darkthrone to Anathema and Therion. Below you’ll find a sampling of three lesser known acts that have significantly changed sound from their earlier works.

Tribulation

This Swedish death metal act had a cult hit back in 2009 with debut full-length “The Horror” (reviewed here), which was a brutal and unrelenting take on death/thrash that never let up. Short but sweet, the tracks were brief bites of devastation that didn’t overstay their welcome.

Fast forward to 2013, and Tribulation is an altogether different beast. Unlike the other two bands we’ll look at today, this time the change in sound actually made the songs much longer than before. “The Formulas of Death” (check out the review) saw the band become a progressive death metal outfit with plenty of melody and unexpected stylistic shifts. If it weren’t for the remaining thrash influence in the guitar sounds and the recurring death vocals, this would essentially be two different bands.

Hear the difference yourself through the clips below taken from each album. There is a lot going on musically throughout the second album, so a single song doesn’t really give enough to digest the breadth of the change, but you can also check out the new song “When the Sky is Black with Devils” via the band’s Facebook profile.

More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Sunday Old School: Entombed

Going through the Sunday Old School archives, it’s notable that most of the death metal we’ve covered tends to focus on American bands such as Obituary, Morbid Angel and Deicide, but the country that arguably has one of the most respected death metal scenes in the world, is the northern European country of Sweden, and one of their most notable contributions was Entombed. Entombed began life from the ashes of another acclaimed extreme metal group, Nihilist, who formed in the Swedish capital city of Stockholm in 1987 and quickly established themselves as one of the most important names in the then burgeoning death metal in Sweden. After bassist Johnny Hedlund left to form, Unleashed, the rest of the band carried on as Entombed and soon signed a deal with Earache Records, who had recently released such seminal works from Napalm Death, Carcass and Godflesh, through which they released their debut album, "Left Hand Path" in the spring of 1990.

The album was an instant favourite among the extreme metal crowd, and has gone on to be described as the blueprint for Swedish death metal, thanks primarily to the guitar tone used and is now regarded as one of the best death metal records in history. This tone was used once more on their sophomore album, "Clandestine," which again received rave reviews from the metal media and established the group as one of the most exciting, in a genre that was at the top of it’s game. "Clandestine" was also seen as more accessible than "Left Hand Path," and as a further step towards the unique Swedish take on death metal.

Despite receiving acclaim for their first two albums, Entombed took the surprising step of changing their sound somewhat, incorporating a more rock and roll vibe into their death metal roots, to create a genre known as "death and roll." This change in direction resulted in the 1993 album, "Wolverine Blues," which caused a rift between the band and Earache after the label agreed a deal with Marvel Comics to use images of their famous character of the same name, to help Entombed reach a broader audience, without consulting the band. This included featuring the Wolverine character on the front cover of the record, and even including a mini Wolverine comic inside the album. The Marvel version of "Wolverine Blues" was also heavily censored, going as far as to remove the song, "Out of Hand" completely. The album itself received a very mixed response, with some fans not to keen on the change in direction, while publications such as Guitar World hailed it as the best death metal album of the year. More...

Read more...  |  8 Comments - Discuss

The Rockstar Ramblings: An Off-Road Affair

This week rock and roll representatives from the suburbs of Philadelphia, state of Ohio, and Portugal bring us videos. Also, a special bonus video from one of Canada's finest for our viewing pleasure. More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Pit Stories: Pantera Stops The Show

Each week we check in with metal musicians to get their favorite mosh pit stories. Today Eric Dow, vocalist of Helsott, shares the following story of a Pantera pit from a Long Beach show:

The Pantera pit in 2000. It was just flat out the biggest, craziest fucking most single fucking chaos even I’ve ever been involved in. I think the Long Beach Sports Arena, makes the whole floor a pit…and they stopped the song, if you didn’t pit. They would stop the song, it didn’t matter if they were three minutes into it…or two minutes, or whatever. Pantera would stop the fucking song if they weren’t happy. So the pit grew about half way…I mean, it was still the biggest pit I’d ever been in…The whole fucking floor. They took the chairs out, it was just concrete. They stopped the song…I thought that was pretty funny. Phil Anselmo was like ‘you didn’t believe me, did you? If you guys are not moving around, we will fucking stop the song again.’

I think the only people that didn’t move were the guys who had their spot on the rail and I wouldn’t have moved either. But yeah, that whole fucking bottom floor…was probably easily 8,000 people. People going this way, people going that way….and then the whole song – the song was ‘Becoming’ – and the whole song, I think I got around the pit twice. It was that big….and I got hit by so many different people. Fuck what was I… I think I was 18... no, no I was 17…that’s right, I was 17 years old at the time. Shit just isn’t like that anymore, man. Concerts are nowhere near like they used to be.
More...

Read more...  |  0 Comments - Discuss

Unearthing The Screamo Underground

This edition of Unearthing The Metal Underground was part of our 2013 April Fools pranks.

The much maligned deathcore genre. Whenever you hear the term, it is beset with cringes from some. Actually, though, deathcore gets a bad rap that merits further investigation. When metalcore evolved into deathcore and placed more emphasis on the screaming, growling and more punctuated breakdowns, plenty of bands were still keeping the heaviness and technical quotient at a good level. There's the pummeling force of the Acacia Strain and the progressive finesse of BTBAM straddling the line with technical death metal on the other end, along with a good measure of heavier and original sounding deathcore bands. More...

Read more...  |  1 Comment - Discuss

Displaying records 521 - 540 of 1,281 1 2 ... 25 26 27 28 29 ... 64 65 Last