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Archive: Sunday Old School Columns

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Sunday Old School: Hurricane

It was Kevin DuBrow (Quiet Riot) who introduced Robert Sarzo to Tony Cavazo. When DuBrow introduces two guys (who just happen to be kid brothers of members of Quiet Riot), you must start a band, it’s a rule. They named their band Hurricane. More...

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Sunday Old School: Agent Steel

We’ve looked at plenty of thrash metal bands over the nearly 200 Sunday Old School columns written so far, but perhaps one are we’ve neglected would be the sub-genre’s predecessor, speed metal. Today, we’ll rectify this with a look at one of the top dogs in the speed metal field, Agent Steel. Agent Steel were formed in 1984 after vocalist John Camps (AKA, John Cyriis) left the band, Abattoir and teamed up with drummer, Chuck Profus. The original Agent Steel lineup was completed with the addition of bass player, George Robb and guitarists Mark Marshall and Bill Simmons. The quintet soon entered the studio to record their first demo, "144,000 Gone," which was received favourably in the local California metal scene, enough so that it found some radio play and earned the band a supporting slot for Slayer as their very first show and helped them receive a record deal with Combat, who had also recently signed Megadeth. Before they could record their first album however, they experienced problems with their guitarists and a short revolving door situation evolved, before they finally settled on Kurt Colfelt and Cyriis’ former Abattoir bandmate, Juan Garcia and set about recording their first full length, which was released in the summer of 1985 under the title, "Skeptics Apocalypse." The record was very well received and is now considered a true classic in the speed metal genre.

Despite the acclaim, Colfelt quit the band soon afterwards when relations soured between him and Cyriis and formed a new band called, Holy Terror. His position was filled by Bernie Versailles who made his recording debut with the band on the "Mad Locust Rising" EP, which was notable for its cover of the Judas Priest song, "The Ripper." Following the release of the EP, the group had to find another new member when George Robb quit and was replaced by bassist, Michael Zaputil. With a new bassist on board, the band got to work on their sophomore full length, though the album’s recording was interrupted for a while by a European tour with countrymen, Anthrax and Overkill, footage of which was later released as part of the home video, "US Speed Metal Attack." More...

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Sunday Old School: Fudge Tunnel

Earache Records is without a doubt one of the biggest record labels in metal music. They made their name by signing some of the best extreme bands around, but also branched out into more experiemental areas at times, including with today's featured band, Fudge Tunnel. Fudge Tunnel were formed in 1988 in the English city of Nottingham, where the original lineup of singing guitarist, Alex Newport, drummer Adrian Parkin and a bassist known only as, Mark, would rehearse above a working men’s club. After Mark decided he’d be more comfortable playing guitar, the group recruited a new bass player named, David Ryley, before Mark left altogether. The trio’s first release was a self-titled EP, which hit the shelves via Pigboy Records in 1990 and was very well received by the music press. They built on their attention by joining up and coming industrial metal outfit, Godflesh on a tour and releasing a second EP named, "The Sweet Sound of Excess," both of which helped them to gain a record deal with Earache, who were based in Nottingham and had made a name for themselves by signing such popular acts as Napalm Death, Carcass and American death metal group, Morbid Angel.

Their debut album, "Hate Songs in E Minor" drew controversy before it was even released. Just three weeks prior to the record’s release, the Earache Records office was raided by the Nottingham Vice Squad, who confiscated any "offensive material" which included the original artwork for the album (as well as, according to Carcass frontman, Jeff Walker, an Alice Cooper poster.) The setback forced Fudge Tunnel to using live images for the cover art instead (charges were eventually dropped and the original artwork appeared on t-shirts.) The album itself met a very strong reception from metal fans and featured a unique sound which remains very difficult to pinpoint, as well as some unique song titles and two covers, both classic rock staples, namely, "Sunshine of Your Love" by Cream and "Cat Scratch Fever" by Ted Nugent, who the album was also dedicated to. Among the album’s admirers was Sepultura frontman, Max Cavalera, who was so impressed with the record that he invited the band out on tour with Sepultura, though Newport would later express his distaste that the tour seemed to have lumped Fudge Tunnel into the metal category. More...

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Sunday Old School: Megadeth

With their new album, "Super Collider" having hit the shelves this past week, today seemed like the best possible time to take a look at one of the biggest and most controversial names in the history of thrash metal, Megadeth. Everyone and their dog knows that the seeds of Megadeth were sewn in 1983 when Metallica sacked their aggressive guitarist, Dave Mustaine, right before they were scheduled to record their first album, "Kill 'em All." They sent Mustaine back to California from New York on a bus, where he sat and furiously plotted to form a new band which would be faster and nastier than Metallica. While he was on the bus, he found a pamphlet which contained the phrase, "The arsenal of megadeath can’t be rid no matter what the peace treaties come to." Liking the sound of the word, "megadeath," he chose it as one of the first song titles for his new group, which was formed a few weeks later under the name, Fallen Angels, though this was changed soon after to Megadeth at the suggestion of the band’s original singer, Lor Kane. Mustaine and bass player, David Ellefson auditioned a number of drummers, singers and guitarsts throughout the forging of Megadeth, most notably Slayer guitarist, Kerry King, who performed a handful of shows with the group before deciding to concentrate on his own band, much to the disappointment of Mustaine.

Eventually, Mustaine decided to handle the vocal duties himself and they hired fusion drummer, Gar Samuelson before landing a record deal with Combat Records, after which they finally found a second guitarist in Chris Poland, who knew Samuelson from their time together in the jazz fusion outfit, The New Yorkers. The group received eight thousand dollars advance from Combat to record their debut album and were forced to produce the record themselves after spending a large chunk of it on drugs and alcohol. The result, "Killing Is My Business… And Business Is Good," was a success, selling well for an independent release, being hailed as a thrash metal classic and gaining the attention of major label, Capitol, who would sign the band after they were unhappy with the initial recording of their second album, which Capitol also bought the rights to. This sophomore effort, "Peace Sells… But Who’s Buying?" was finally released in 1986 and would prove to be their breakthrough and is now considered to be amongst the top thrash albums ever, along with "Master of Puppets" by Metallica and "Reign in Blood," by Slayer, both of which were also released in 1986. The title track from the album was made into a music video, a first for Megadeth and was a popular choice on MTV’s Headbanger’s Ball show. The success of the album allowed them to tour with other established acts such as King Diamond and Alice Cooper, the latter of which once summoned the group to his bus one night to warn them of their drug habits. More...

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Sunday Old School: Uriah Heep

A few weeks ago, Sunday Old School took a look at British hard rock legends, UFO, one of the architects of the heavy metal sound. With the recent passing of their bass player, it seemed like an opportune time to examine another English band that helped define the heavy style, Uriah Heep. The band was initially formed under the moniker, Spice by guitarist Mick Box and singer, David Garrick, who met while members of another band called, The Stalkers. They rounded up the lineup with the additions of Scottish drummer, Alex Napier and bass player, Paul Newton. They performed regularly, working their reputation up to being a regular headline act and soon led them to sign with Vertigo Records, whereupon they decided to change their name, deciding to go with "Uriah Heep" after the character from the Charles Dickens novel, "David Copperfield," since "Dickens’ name was everywhere in Christmas 1969 due to it being the hundredth anniversary of his death." It was also around this time that the group decided to add a keyboardist to the mix, inspired by another early heavy band, Vanilla Fudge, a position which was eventually filled by Ken Hensley, who previously played with Newton in The Gods.

They released their debut album in 1970, which was self-titled in the United States but was known everywhere else as, "Very ‘eavy, Very ‘umble," which was a reference to a phrase frequently said by the Uriah Heep character in "David Copperfield." Although the album has found favour over time and contains one of their trademark songs, "Gypsy," it initially received a very frosty reception. Cold enough in fact, that Rolling Stone reviewer, Melissa Mills opened her review of the album with, "If this band makes it, I’ll have to commit suicide." The band followed, "Very ‘eavy…" by releasing, "Salisbury," a progressive rock record if ever there was one, exemplified by the sixteen minute long title track, in which the group were accompanied by a twenty four piece orchestra. Like their debut, it also featured one of their best known songs, this time, "Lady in Black," which would become a hit in Germany when it was re-released six years later. The album itself was not received much better than it’s predecessor, but nevertheless, generated enough interest to allow Uriah Heep to tour the United States for the first time, where they joined Three Dog Night and Canadian rockers, Steppenwolf. More...

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Sunday Old School: Black N’ Blue

During the eighties a lot of bands were pushed into the glam-pop sideshow, and for many this paid off. Black N’ Blue was not one of those bands. The original draped-in-denim hard rockers lost their mojo once they changed their sound. The band still sold around a million records. This was despite the changes. More...

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Sunday Old School: UFO

Some bands at the beginning of metal have gone on to become icons which in the eyes of fans can do no wrong, regardless of what they release. Others also contributed heavily to the development of metal, but despite being rightly regarded as legends, sometimes escape the attention of many fans. If ever there was a group that deserved more recognition, it would British hard rockers, UFO. UFO was formed in London in 1969 by vocalist Phil Mogg, bassist Pete Way, guitar player Mick Bolton and drummer Andy Parker, initially under the moniker, Hocus Pocus, though they soon changed their name to UFO in honour of a local club where they were discovered by Beacon Records. Their first album, "UFO1," was released one year after they changed their name, in October 1970 and met with varying success, garnering mixed reviews but spawned some hits overseas, most notably the song, "Boogie" (also known as "Boogie for George," which became a hit in Germany, and their cover of the Eddie Cochran classic, "C’mon Everybody," which became a massive success in Japan, where the album was also well received commercially, as was their second release, "UFO2: Flying," which received more positive reviews and featured the near twenty minute epic, "Star Storm."

After the (initially Japan only) release of their first live album, "Live," (later re-titled, "UFO Lands In Tokyo,") the band parted company with Mick Bolton and searched for a more traditional rock guitarist to replace him. They initially hired Larry Wallis, who lasted one European tour before leaving and eventually becoming the first guitarist for Motorhead, before embarking on another tour with Bernie Marsden, who would also leave soon afterwards and go on to become a founding member of Whitesnake. Their search came to an end in the summer of 1973 when they recruited 18 year old German guitarist, Michael Schenker, who was then still a member of the Scorpions. With their new guitarist in tow, the band recorded their third studio album, "Phenomenon," which showcased their harder sound and remains one of their most beloved albums amongst fans today. It featured some of their best known work, such as "Rock Bottom" and the hard rock classic, "Doctor Doctor." The record attracted many new fans in the United States and their native, Britain, both of which were expanded upon after the release of their next album, "Force It" in 1975 and the 1976 record, "No Heavy Petting," which marked their first release as a five piece, following the addition of keyboardist, Danny Peyronel, who was soon replaced by Paul Raymond. More...

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Sunday Old School: Melvins

Thriftway is a small grocery store chain here in Washington, one I stop at a couple of times a week for laundry soap or soda. Whenever I'm in the store I can't help but remember that this is where the Melvins got its start. Back in the early eighties, three teens from Montesano High School worked at a Thriftway store over in Greys Harbor County, WA. They despised their shift supervisor, whose name was Melvin. They even named their garage band after him, cranking out the slowest and most wretched riffs to ever hit the alternative rock/early indie metal scene. More...

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Sunday Old School: Forbidden

Of all the metal scenes across the world, the eighties thrash metal scene in California is probably of the most well known, having produced such big names as Metallica and Megadeth. It’s been some time since we examined a band from the scene, so this week, Sunday Old School will be taking a look at Forbidden, one of the heaviest and most daring bands from the Bay Area. Forbidden was formed in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1985, originally under the moniker Forbidden Evil, by guitarist Rob Flynn and drummer Jim Pittman, who quickly joined forces with vocalist Russ Anderson, bassist John Tegio and another guitarist, Craig Loicicero. The quintet made a live record entitled, "Live at Ruthies Inn – The Eastern Front" before Tegio, Pittman and Flynn all left the band, (the last of whom would join Vio-Lence before going on to form Machine Head,) and their places were taken by Matt Camacho, Paul Bostaph and Glen Avelais respectively.

This new incarnation of the band decided to shorten their name to Forbidden, as they were afraid that the name Forbidden Evil would stereotype them as a black metal outfit. They soon signed to Combat Records, home of such other thrash contemporaries as Heathen and Nuclear Assault and in 1988, they released their first full length album, "Forbidden Evil." The record was a hit with critics and thrash metal fans alike and has since gone on to be considered one of the true classics in the genre and featured a number of songs that have become live staples such as "Chalice of Blood" and "Through Eyes of Glass," as well as the title track. More...

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Sunday Old School: White Lion

It may be a stretch to call an eighties hair band that sold millions of records underrated, but look closely: White Lion fits the profile. Despite going all-in with a glam look and cheese-filled videos, there was actual music being played. Listen to the guitars and drums, and for heaven’s sake, don’t look directly into their eyes! More...

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Sunday Old School: D.R.I.

Crossover thrash is an interesting genre, one whose stalwarts stories often begin with them forming as a hardcore outfit and bringing in metal influences as time went by and this week's featured band, Dirty Rotten Imbeciles are no exception. Dirty Rotten Imbeciles (or D.R.I. as they commonly known,) were formed in the Texas city of Houston on the 2nd of May 1982 by vocalist Kurt Brecht, his brother Eric on drums, bass player Dennis Johnson and guitarist, Spike Cassidy, who was the only one of the founding D.R.I. members not to have been a part of the hardcore band, Suburbanites. They performed their first gig exactly two months after forming and four months later, made their first record, the "Dirty Rotten EP," which featured twenty two songs but lasted only eighteen minutes. The EP was very well received and demand for the 7" led the band to re-releasing the effort as a 12" record, under the title, "Dirty Rotten LP." In order to advance in the emerging hardcore punk scene, the group relocated to San Francisco, California, where they reportedly faced many hardships, living in their van and resorting to eating at soup kitchens. The hard living was too much for Johnson, and he decided to return home to Texas, his place being taken by Sebastion Amok before the band secured a fairly high profile slot on the "Rock Against Reagan" tour, supporting the Dead Kennedys. Amok was sacked after the tour and replaced by Josh Pappe.

Pappe made his recording debut with the band on their next EP, "Violent Pacification," which featured four songs and once again earned a positive reception. After touring in support of the record, Eric Brecht decided to leave the band, owing in part to his recent marriage and his place behind the kit was taken by Felix Griffin. The next year, the band recorded and released their second full length record, "Dealing With It," which featured a sound moving noticeably closer to metal, though it was essentially still a hardcore album. It included the song, "Couch Slouch," which had previously featured on the “Violent Pacification” EP, as well as the opening tracks, "Snap" and "I'd Rather Be Sleeping," which would be covered by New York thrash legends, Anthrax the next decade. They were once again forced into finding a new bassist when Pappe decided to leave the band following extensive touring, with Offenders bass player, Mikey Offender chosen as his replacement. In recognition of the heavy touring the band had undertaken, they released their first home video, "Live at the Olympic" in 1986, which was filmed in Los Angeles. More...

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Sunday Old School: Jag Panzer

While the cities in New York, Florida and the Bay Area drove the early power/thrash independent music scene in the early eighties, another legendary U.S. band came to prominence far up in the Rocky Mountains. A group of musicians who knew each other since the second grade started their own band in homage to the European scene, calling themselves Tyrant before learning of the L.A. and German bands of the same name. More...

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Sunday Old School: Entombed

Going through the Sunday Old School archives, it’s notable that most of the death metal we’ve covered tends to focus on American bands such as Obituary, Morbid Angel and Deicide, but the country that arguably has one of the most respected death metal scenes in the world, is the northern European country of Sweden, and one of their most notable contributions was Entombed. Entombed began life from the ashes of another acclaimed extreme metal group, Nihilist, who formed in the Swedish capital city of Stockholm in 1987 and quickly established themselves as one of the most important names in the then burgeoning death metal in Sweden. After bassist Johnny Hedlund left to form, Unleashed, the rest of the band carried on as Entombed and soon signed a deal with Earache Records, who had recently released such seminal works from Napalm Death, Carcass and Godflesh, through which they released their debut album, "Left Hand Path" in the spring of 1990.

The album was an instant favourite among the extreme metal crowd, and has gone on to be described as the blueprint for Swedish death metal, thanks primarily to the guitar tone used and is now regarded as one of the best death metal records in history. This tone was used once more on their sophomore album, "Clandestine," which again received rave reviews from the metal media and established the group as one of the most exciting, in a genre that was at the top of it’s game. "Clandestine" was also seen as more accessible than "Left Hand Path," and as a further step towards the unique Swedish take on death metal.

Despite receiving acclaim for their first two albums, Entombed took the surprising step of changing their sound somewhat, incorporating a more rock and roll vibe into their death metal roots, to create a genre known as "death and roll." This change in direction resulted in the 1993 album, "Wolverine Blues," which caused a rift between the band and Earache after the label agreed a deal with Marvel Comics to use images of their famous character of the same name, to help Entombed reach a broader audience, without consulting the band. This included featuring the Wolverine character on the front cover of the record, and even including a mini Wolverine comic inside the album. The Marvel version of "Wolverine Blues" was also heavily censored, going as far as to remove the song, "Out of Hand" completely. The album itself received a very mixed response, with some fans not to keen on the change in direction, while publications such as Guitar World hailed it as the best death metal album of the year. More...

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Sunday Old School: Whitesnake

With tens of millions of albums sold, David Coverdale’s turbulent relationship with Tawny Kitaen, and the hair that all other hair would be judged by…we give you Whitesnake. As David Coverdale’s hair grew so did album sales. Is this a coincidence? Coverdale would say (presumably) that his hair and album sales are not related and this is a misconception. The facts are that during his eighties reign (when his hair was at an all-time Aqua Net high) album sales were through the roof. Later, he teamed up with Jimmy Page to form Coverdale/Page, shorter hair, fewer sales. Coincidence? More...

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Sunday Old School: Xentrix

On February 3rd of this year, Sunday Old School took a look at Acid Reign, one of Britain’s best contributions to thrash metal. A day later, another of the British thrash greats, Xentrix announced that they had decided to reunite, after people had demanded them to do so for years. This week, we will be giving Xentrix the recognition they deserve, and examining the career of one of the biggest names in British thrash. Xentrix were formed in the Lancashire city of Preston and garnered themselves plenty of interest when their demo received a perfect score in Kerrang! magazine, which eventually led to a deal with Roadrunner Records, following a successful audition. Through the label, the band released their first full length album, "Shattered Existence" in 1989, and embarked on a tour with fellow thrashers, Sabbat, to support the release.

The band followed the release of their debut album with a single, a cover of the Ray Parker Jr. hit, "Ghostbusters." It was a controversial move in several aspects, not least in the copyright area, which forced the band to re-issue the record with a different cover due to use of the "Ghostbusters" logo without permission. Despite the novelty of a thrash metal version of the song, the band had rightly earned the respect of their peers with, "Shattered Existence," as evidenced by their slot opening for Bay Area heavy hitters, Testament and the group soon set to work on a second album, which was released in 1990 under the title, "For Whose Advantage?" The album was a hit amongst thrash fans, being heralded as one of the best thrash releases of the year, with the title track and the song, "Questions" in particular receiving praise, and they once again hit the road with Sabbat to promote the album. More...

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Sunday Old School: Gamma Ray

A short while ago, Sunday Old School took a look at German power metal heroes, Helloween, which was founded by guitarist Kai Hansen in 1984. Hansen left the group in 1989, only to return in some style a year later, with a new band that soon become one of the biggest and most influential in their field, Gamma Ray. The seeds of the group were sewn while Hansen was doing some studio work for countrymen, Blind Guardian, and decided to form his own project afterwards, teaming up with his friend, Ralf Scheepers, who would handle the vocal duties. The duo would soon become a quartet when they added bass player Uwe Wessel and drummer Mathias Burchardt. Despite the problems Hansen had previously had with the company, Gamma Ray signed a deal with Noise Records for their first album, "Heading For Tomorrow," which was released in February 1990 and was received very warmly by the music press and metal fans alike. Shortly after their debut was released, Gamma Ray made several changes by hiring a new drummer and guitarist in Uli Kusch and Dirk Schlächter respectively. This new incarnation of the band released an EP later that year entitled, "Heaven Can Wait," before releasing their first full length studio album together in September 1991, "Sigh No More." Despite it’s somewhat comic album cover, the record was significantly darker than, "Heading For Tomorrow," with lyrics covering topics such as the Persian Gulf War that was ongoing at the time.

Once the band returned from a Japanese tour, they made yet another lineup change, with founding bassist Uwe Wessel and Kusch leaving the group due to disagreements, with Kusch going on to join Helloween, making his debut on the fan favourite, "Master of Rings." The duo were replaced by bass player Jan Rubach and drummer Thomas Nack, who made their presence known to fans in 1993 with the third Gamma Ray album, "Insanity and Genius," which was recorded at the band’s own custom studio. "Insanity and Genius" was closer sonically to "Heading for Tomorrow," and likewise received some very positive reviews. It was notable for Hansen singing on the track, "Heal Me" and Schlächter performing vocal duties on the song, "Your Tørn Is Over." More...

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Sunday Old School: Fates Warning

The band I bring you today has special significance to me, because looking at its history is almost like looking at a mirror image of my own. Thirty years ago this year, when I got my start on college radio, these guys were the first band I ever sat in on an interview with. That interview was done by the other metal DJ on WNHU, with Joe DiBiase and John Arch sitting behind the mic with a demo in hand for their new band Misfit. That session was also one of their very first interviews as a band. Special times from a period long ago indeed. More...

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Sunday Old School: Nuclear Assault

It seems to be a fairly regular start to the story of many metal bands: "It began with a firing…" In this week’s case, the story of Nuclear Assault began when New York thrash giants Anthrax fired their bass player, Danny Lilker, who decided to form a new band with a more aggressive approach. His first recruitment into the band that would become Nuclear Assault was vocalist John Connelly, who had previously been a roadie with Anthrax, before rounding out the lineup with guitarist Mike Bogush and drummer Scott Duboys. With the group now complete, they soon recorded a demo which featured some of the songs that would become staples of their future live shows such as, "Hang the Pope" and "Stranded in Hell." They followed the demo with their first live show at the Union Jack in South River, New Jersey, before deciding that Bogush should be replaced, with his position being taken by Anthony Bramante, who made his debut with the band at the legendary L’Amour club in Brooklyn. Nuclear Assault made another change after this performance, when drummer Scott Duboys left the group and was replaced by Glenn Evans, formerly of TT Quick. This new incarnation of the band recorded a second demo entitled, "Live Suffer Die" and increased their profile by performing across the United States.

Their hard work paid off and the quartet signed a multi-album deal with Combat Records, who had previously released the debut album from Megadeth, as well as several records from European bands such as Celtic Frost, Venom and Raven. The first of these albums came in April 1986 under the title, "Game Over." The record was a hit among thrash fans and it earned the group a spot supporting speed metal act Agent Steel and British outfit Atomkraft in Europe, garnering them attention across the Atlantic. Despite their deal with Combat, Nuclear Assault felt that their contract with the label was very constrictive and they left to sign with I.R.S. Records, releasing their sophomore album, and their first for their new label, "Survive" in 1988. The record was a success, reaching number 145 in the Billboard Album Chart and spawning two singles in the form of "Fight to be Free" and the Led Zeppelin cover, "Good Times Bad Times." The commercial success of "Survive" led to the group touring extensively, including performing as the opening act for Californian thrash kings, Slayer, and their own headlining tour of Europe, where they were supported by British thrashers, Acid Reign. More...

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Sunday Old School: Winger

Kip Winger could have been a member of Kiss. I am basing this notion on body hair alone. As the number of eighties bands grew, Winger was one of the bands that started the “too much” movement eventually breaking in the early nineties. This was foreshadowed by the Beavis & Butthead character Stewart wearing a Winger shirt as a sign of being weak and available for jokey punch lines. More...

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Sunday Old School: Krokus

When most people think of metal music from Switzerland, they almost immediately think of Celtic Frost or Coroner . But the home of tax dodgers’ bank accounts also hosts of the best balls out, hard rock bands to ever emerge from Europe in the form of Krokus. Krokus were formed in the Swiss city of Solothurn in 1975, initially as a progressive rock outfit and released their self-titled debut album in 1976, which was limited to only 560 copies and was never re-released. After witnessing an AC/DC concert, the band decided to abandon their prog style and opted for a more hard rock approach, leading bass player Chris von Rohr to take over the position of lead singer. This new, harder incarnation of the group proved to be a success in Switzerland, though their subsequent albums, "To You All" and "Painkiller" (released in some countries as, "Pay It In Metal") were critically panned by some reviewers. The band soon realised that von Rohr would have to step down from the mic as he was unable to reach the vocal standards they had hoped. He returned to his former position as bass player while Malta native, Marc Storace, formerly of TEA and Eazy Money entered the fray as their new singer.

Storace’s recording debut came in the form of the 1980 album, "Metal Rendez-vous," which was met with a mixed reaction critically, but found favour amongst many rock fans over the world, particularly in the United Kingdom where the song, "Heatstrokes" topped the heavy metal charts. This was also the first time the band received much attention from the United States and the success of the album resulted in it being certified triple platinum in their home country. They followed, "Metal Renez-vous" the next year with, "Hardware" which received negative reviews and was unable to achieve the commercial success of it’s predecessor, reaching only Gold status in Switzerland. However, it did see the band enter the charts in the United States, Great Britain, Sweden, Germany and Austria, where it peaked at number sixteen. The record also featured some songs which would go on to become fan favourites such as, "Easy Rocker" and "Rock City." More...

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