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Former Lacuna Coil Guitarist Claudio Leo Passes Away

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Band Photo: Lacuna Coil (?)

Lacuna Coil vocalist Cristina Scabbia announced that former bandmate Claudio Leo, who played with the band from 1995-1998 (including a performance on the band's demo under the moniker Ethereal and the 1998 self-titled EP) has passed away. The cause of death was not reported and no other information was offered as of yet.

Leo was the founding member of the gothic rock act Cayne in 1999. Cayne is scheduled to release its self-titled sophomore LP on February 14, 2013. There has been no official comments from Cayne as of yet.

The following announcement came via Scabbia's Official Facebook page:

"It's with deep sadness that I inform you all know that our dear friend and ex guitar player Claudio Leo left us. My deepest condolences to his family, close friends and the band Cayne. You will always be remembered for your strenght and positivity. We love you, Claudio."

Check out Leo with Cayne in the band's 2012 video for "My Damnation":

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8 Comments on "Former Lacuna Coil Member Claudio Leo Passes Away"

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Blindgreed1's avatar

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1. Blindgreed1 writes:

Damn... RIP.

# Jan 17, 2013 @ 1:38 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
wilco's avatar

Member

2. wilco writes:

sad news rip

# Jan 17, 2013 @ 2:01 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Borntomosh's avatar

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3. Borntomosh writes:

RIP. Such a shame.

# Jan 17, 2013 @ 3:09 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
RememberMetal?'s avatar

Writer/Reviewer

4. RememberMetal? writes:

Sad stuff.

I recently listened to the Lacuna Coil self-titled EP and it's still quite good. Far better than anything from Karmacode forward. The guitars definitely had more personality and punch early in their career (98-02 releases) and the debut EP is no exception.

RIP good sir.

# Jan 22, 2013 @ 9:12 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Anonymous Reader
5. coco writes:

I believe one thing remembermetal? should realize is that just because a particular album is the first in an artist discography does not make it the best. You seem to be trying too hard here, sir. I have seen you post this about Korn and how their first two albums are great(just because they are the earliest albums -.-)

# Jan 22, 2013 @ 7:06 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
RememberMetal?'s avatar

Writer/Reviewer

6. RememberMetal? writes:

coco
I agree, most of my favorite bands get better with each release but all too often, earlier albums are indeed the best. For example: compare 80's Metallica to present day Metallica. One can easily and objectively discern a decline in quality in their music.

In many cases, the songs on early albums have been fine-tuned for years before being put to record, where as only months are spent writing and tweaking songs on subsequent releases. Other times the artist is more adventurous early in their career and becomes more careful or more palatable to cater to a broader (pop-friendly) audience.

Early albums are fueled by starving artists with something to prove, (early Korn) where as artists who have found success commonly stick to the winning formula, (1998-99 Korn) or jump onto a trend (dubstep Korn), others become fat in a sense and thus lazy and just start doing easy, cash grab music (Korn's cover songs). Addiction, discord in the band, record label issues, family etc tend to throw a wrench into later albums, rather than early ones. Artists can get bored, instrumental and vocal talents can whither with age, creative energy gets diverted to side projects, or the masterminds simply run out of ideas later in their career, leaving a legacy of burnout albums in their twilight.

This is not always the case. Many of my favorite artists have maintained their level of quality or improved even after decades of releases. But the majority of decent bands start strong, hit a zenith and fade slowly or suddenly. It's sort of microcosm for life in general.

# Jan 22, 2013 @ 9:50 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
DeathInEye's avatar

Member

7. DeathInEye writes:

RIP Claudio Leo

I think we should also account a percentage of fan boredom. If a band never really tweaks their sound, the fan will become bored with buying the same album 2 or 3 times. It becomes a matter of having favorite versions, which will naturally drift toward the songs the fan has an attachment to, probably an earlier version with a guitarist we liked.

# Jan 24, 2013 @ 7:22 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
RememberMetal?'s avatar

Writer/Reviewer

8. RememberMetal? writes:

Indeed. Fans are the ultimate x-factor for any band's output. In a bid to attract more fans, I feel Lacuna Coil changed their sound from a distinctly European goth rock flavor to a more American, nu-metal-lite sound. Look no further than the stark contrast between "Unleashed Memories" and "Karmacode".

To the band's credit, they have more fans now.

# Jan 25, 2013 @ 7:25 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address

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