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God Forbid Guitarist Doc Coyle Comments On Aging In The Metal Scene

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Guitarist Doc Coyle of God Forbid has posted a new editorial through Metal Sucks about aging in the heavy metal scene. An excerpt from his comments follows:

"In the last few years, something seemed to happen and I barely noticed. Suddenly, I’m no longer the young kid at the show. I’m one of the guys hiding out by the bar. I’m not crowd surfing, not covered in sweat with my shirt off, and I’m certainly not moshing. I’m also not randomly yelling 'Slayer!', but that seems to span all demographics. I became… (gulp)… an adult. I don’t know what the range is in the ages of the followers of MetalSucks, but I’ll assume that it’s a mix of younger and older metal fans. I am 29 years old, but I still feel relatively young and energetic considering my opening salvo. I’m the youngest member of my band, and younger than a good majority of my friends in bands and the industry.

"With that said, I think there comes a time for all metal heads, and probably all adults for that matter, when you look at what is popular amongst the true youth culture (16-24), and you feel as if not only do you not relate to it, but it feels alien, as if it’s creation was not meant for your consumption (which it wasn’t) – and it also seems inferior to music that you grew up with. I’m only 29, and I’m already having 'back in my day' moments. It kind of scared me, and I began to wonder if I was being obtuse and a little too set in my ways, or if my analysis was accurate.

"In some ways, I know I’m not crazy because I feel like I grew up in a fantastic era musically. Although a tenuous time for metal, the early 90’s was the most fertile era for rock music since the mid 70’s. It’s hard to argue we didn’t experience an explosion of classic bands that are just as relevant and sought after to this day including Radiohead, Soundgarden, Nine Inch Nails, Nirvana, Weezer, Tool, STP, Rage Against the Machine, Faith No More, Alice In Chains, etc. Because rock is related and a gateway into metal, I consider this period relevant. Also, I feel that metal’s 'demise' in the 90’s was a bit exaggerated. Metallica, Megadeth, White Zombie and GNR were all over MTV and radio, Pantera was a multi-platinum arena act, and metal flourished in the underground where we saw the ascendance of death metal and bands like Meshuggah, At the Gates, and Death were seemingly reinventing the wheel. I would have to say that I stand by my assessment that my generation had it pretty damn good. Although I’m sure those who came of age in the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s would say the same.

"In a way, I think I feel older than I am because I was always the youngest guy in my social group, and I also always had a deep respect and curiosity for heavy music’s history and roots. I would always go back and discover who influenced my favorite bands. I hope today’s generation takes the same approach, but it doesn’t always feel like it.

"I don’t want anyone to think that I have a problem with modern metal. My position is actually the contrary, and I’m often frustrated by friends of mine who don’t stay current and than complain that there aren’t any good new bands out there. I think that there has been a steady dose of vibrant, exciting young bands as long as you are willing to take the initiative to search and seek out these bands. I try to stay current, and I still feel behind the ball in regards to checking out new bands compared to some of my industry/blogger friends. The main objective for me as I age is not to become jaded and dismissive. In my opinion, that’s where artistic stagnation comes from. I give so much credit to bands like Exodus, Testament, and even Judas Priest (when they put out Painkiller) for staying current and acknowledging the evolution and notable improvements in heavy metal from it’s extremity to it’s technicality and it’s production."

Source: Metal Sucks

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8 Comments on "Doc Coyle Comments On Aging In The Metal Scene"

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Jenny's avatar

Member

1. Jenny writes:

I don't care what anybody says, I dig this a ton.
This Man has every right to say that he feels old; and in my opinion, older is better, as you know more that way. Anyhow, there's just so much going on as time moves along and before you know it, things are different.

I respect the fact that he acknowledges that new bands are capable of producing good Metal. The only line that I'm not certain of is: "I give so much credit to bands like Exodus, Testament, and even Judas Priest (when they put out Painkiller) for staying current and acknowledging the evolution and notable improvements in heavy metal from it’s extremity to it’s technicality and it’s production."

# May 14, 2010 @ 8:33 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
deathbringer's avatar

Founder, owner & programmer

2. deathbringer writes:

I can relate to most of what he says, but when the day comes that you've stopped spontaneously yelling "Slaaaaayer!," you have right then lost it.

# May 14, 2010 @ 9:10 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Anonymous Reader
3. RTB writes:

^Hell ya boss, agree with that. Im in my early 30s, and i always look around when i go to shows looking for someone older than me, and so far there has been....i dont feel old as fahq or out of place at shows yet, but even if i did, i d never stop going....
In the sam dunn documentary metal a headbangers journey, there is a scene when he goes to the wacken festival in germany, and there is this shot of this old man right up front with a beard and glasses headbangin and rockin out.....that ll be me.....minus the beard...anyways doc keep kickin azz brother
F*CKIN SLAYERRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

# May 14, 2010 @ 10:16 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Cynic's avatar

Senior Reviewer

4. Cynic writes:

"I feel that metal’s 'demise' in the 90’s was a bit exaggerated" - I don't, Metallica being all over the radio was a good sign for metal? Phhp.

# May 14, 2010 @ 11:12 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
GORECUNT's avatar

Member

5. GORECUNT writes:

I know how he feels.

# May 15, 2010 @ 12:52 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
METAL213's avatar

Member

6. METAL213 writes:

I couldn't have said it better. I've been feeling this way for a couple years now and I'm only 21. I however think the 90s was just as great a time for metal as the 80s were with the birth of thrash and later death metal. The 90s had a much wider variety of sub genres coming up then at that time. There still is a lot of good new metal out there like Whitechapel, Suicide Silence, Dirge Within, Thy Will Be Done, Periphery, Carnifex and others. I completely agree with the fashion comment too

# May 20, 2010 @ 2:42 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Anonymous Reader
7. ZT* writes:

arrested development....it's worked quite well for me, I'll say that much.:)

Doc, stop worrying about it, just enjoy yourself for pete's sake.

# May 20, 2010 @ 10:58 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Anonymous Reader
8. ZT* writes:

"I think there comes a time for all metal heads, and probably all adults for that matter, when you look at what is popular amongst the true youth culture (16-24), and you feel as if not only do you not relate to it, but it feels alien, as if it’s creation was not meant for your consumption"

Uh, i;ve always felt that way, but do I let it stop ME? No.

# May 20, 2010 @ 11:02 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address

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