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Orange Goblin - "A Eulogy For The Damned" (CD)

Orange Goblin - "A Eulogy For The Damned" CD cover image

"A Eulogy For The Damned" track listing:

1. Red Tide Rising
2. Stand For Something
3. Acid Trial
4. The Filthy And The Few
5. Save Me From Myself
6. The Fog
7. Return To Mars
8. Death Of Aquarius
9. Bishop's Wolf
10. A Eulogy To The Damned

Reviewed by on January 19, 2012

"Gloomy doom and punk power have seldom sounded so good together."

"A Eulogy For The Damned," Orange Goblin's seventh full-length studio album, finds the band splitting the difference between its two most obvious influences, Black Sabbath and Motorhead, for a listening experience that divides itself well between moody doom and thrashy punk sounds. It's no-frills guitar rock with sparks of technical virtuosity and psychedelia to liven things up.

Guitarist Joe Hoare is the hero here, with the speedy "Acid Trial" and the pure punk of "The Filthy And The Few" showing off his technical skills. Meanwhile, "Stand For Something" is a doomy blues grinder with a southern twist, while "The Fog" plays — at least instrumentally — like an outtake from Black Sabbath's "Master Of Reality."

Singer Ben Ward's voice now rivals the immortal Mr. Kilmister when it comes to gravel, but he manages to turn things tuneful on "A Eulogy To The Damned" and especially the slightly southern-fried "Save Me From Myself." The rhythm section of drummer Chris Turner and bassist Martyn Millard is never anything less than solid, with some truly stellar work on "Save Me From Myself" and "Death Of Aquarius."

The album's one bum track is "Return To Mars," which has some wonderfully psychedelic lyrics, but which loses cohesion somewhere between Hoare's riffing and the rhythm section. It's not a terrible track, but it certainly doesn't measure up to most of the rest of the disc.

With a sound that splits the difference between Sabbath and Motorhead, Orange Goblin serves up a potent dose of '70s-style metal on "A Eulogy For The Damned." Gloomy doom and punk power have seldom sounded so good together.

Highs: "Stand For Something," "Acid Trial" and "The Filthy And The Few."

Lows: "Return To Mars"

Bottom line: The band's seventh full-lenth offers a potent blend of Motorhead and Sabbath-style '70s sounds

Rated 4.0 out of 5 skulls
4.0 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)