"some music was meant to stay underground..."

Dehuman - "Black Throne of all Creation" (CD)

Dehuman - "Black Throne of all Creation" CD cover image

"Black Throne of all Creation" track listing:

1. Apocalypse and Perdition
2. Monstrosity in the Hands of God
3. Eyes of a Thousand
4. Spiral of Loss
5. Down with the World
6. Harvest the Sun
7. Cast of Assassination
8. Black Mamba
9. Path to Oblivion

Reviewed by on June 14, 2012

"Flowing breakdowns enhance the heaviness of each song, and bridges the gap between the breakdown-happy bands of today, with the intestine-churning rhythms of classic death metal."

Twenty-five years after the release of “Scream Bloody Gore,” bands are still following the bloody footprints left by Death and its wretched spawn produced in the humid swamps of Florida. This movement has resounded all over the globe. Dehuman was surely touched by the spirit of Chuck Schuldiner on their debut recording, “Black Throne of All Creation.” The Belgium quartet tempers blunt brutality with surgical precision, and grating groove with pummeling speed.

Andrea Vissol’s voice draws the most obvious comparison to old-school death metal. He has a style akin to John Tardy of Obituary or Death’s early years—a gravelly growl somewhere in the middle of the vocal spectrum between inaudible groans and ear-piercing snarls. Musically, Dehuman follows the tried and true (tried too often) patterns of Suffocation, Morbid Angel and Nile. The epic harmonies on “Apocalypse and Perdition” and “Harvest the Sun” have more in common with European stalwarts Hypocrisy and Amon Amarth than American acts. Flowing breakdowns enhance the heaviness of each song, and bridges the gap between the breakdown-happy bands of today, with the intestine-churning rhythms of classic death metal.

“Spiral of Loss” contains rolling riffs, muffled breakdowns and a siren wail that makes this track stand out above the rest. "Black Mamba" features a number of sweeping solos and slow harmonies that require exceptional time-keeping from the drummer. Laye Louhenapessy studiously fills in these gaps. This is Dehuman at its best; unfortunately, not every song has its own identity.

“Black Throne of All Creation” works on many levels, but midway through the album, each song tends to bleed into the next. Part of the problem is many of the sounds they present seem too familiar. “Black Throne of All Creation” is a good start for Dehuman; however, future endeavors need to reveal more unique qualities for the band to make an impact on a scene that’s over-saturated with clones.

Highs: Dehuman mixes up the pace and creates catchy rhythms.

Lows: Most tracks fail to find a sense of identity.

Bottom line: "Black Throne of All Creation" is a decent death metal album, but brings nothing new to the table.

Rated 3.0 out of 5 skulls
3.0 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)