"some music was meant to stay underground..."

In Solitude - "The World.The Flesh.The Devil" (CD)

In Solitude - "The World.The Flesh.The Devil" CD cover image

"The World.The Flesh.The Devil" track listing:

1. The World, The Flesh, The Devil
2. We Were Never Here
3. Serpents Are Rising
4. Poisoned, Blessed, and Burned
5. Demons
6. To Her Darkness
7. Dance of the Adversary
8. On Burning Paths

Reviewed by on May 21, 2011

"In Solitude got its start in 2002, but on 'The World. The Flesh. The Devil,' the band sounds as though it could've crawled out of the same pit of late-1970s hellfire that gave us early Iron Maiden and Diamond Head. "

In Solitude got its start in 2002, but on "The World. The Flesh. The Devil," the band sounds as though it could've crawled out of the same pit of late-1970s hellfire that gave us early Iron Maiden and Diamond Head. That's definitely a good thing.

With some demos, EPs and a self-titled full-length — as well as numerous changes in the lineup — behind them, the band has honed its classic metal craft well. Yeah, there are only eight songs here, but they add up to nearly an hour full of the solos and sonic twists and turns that were pioneered by Zeppelin and Sabbath, and honed by Maiden into metal's more modern forms.

From the first few notes of "The World, The Flesh, The Devil," guitarists Henrik Palm and Niklas Lindstrom evoke the double-ax fury of the likes of Tipton-Downing and Smith-Murray. Yeah, there are solos galore ("Poisoned, Blessed, and Burned," the aforementioned "The World, The Flesh, The Devil" and "To Her Darkness" particularly stand out in that regard), but there's often a clear division between the lead and rhythm lines even during the verses. There's also an excellent acoustic interlude that closes "Dance Of The Adversary" in a superbly creepy way.

Singer Pelle Ahman isn't exactly Bruce Dickinson caliber, but he more than holds his own, delivering a particularly potent performance in "On Burning Paths," a 13-plus-minute track in which he delivers everything from soaring choruses to angry growls. That said, on most tracks, there isn't an incredible amount of range.

There aren't too many negative points to be had here, though some might find the guitar sound and overall production to feel a little dated. This definitely feels like analog-era metal, and fans of newer sounds aren't going to find any of them here.

With a style that evokes early Maiden and the rest of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal — and the talent to back it up — In Solitude has created a hellaciously good listen on "The World. The Flesh. The Devil." Classic metal fans will delight in cranking this one up.

Highs: "The World, The Flesh, The Devil," "Poisoned Blessed, and Burned"

Lows: Some may find the disc to be a bit dated-sounding.

Bottom line: An excellent slab of classic metal.

Rated 4.0 out of 5 skulls
4.0 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)