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Triggersoul - "Restoration" (CD)

Triggersoul - "Restoration" CD cover image

"Restoration" track listing:

1. Lost Reality
2. Restoration
3. Enemy Lines
4. Forgotten
5. Self Destruct
6. Affliction
7. Wasted Years
8. Step Away

Reviewed by on April 15, 2011

"Yes, it's a sad that we won't be hearing more of Aaron Roe's excellent guitar and keyboard work, but it's mostly a joy to hear them for the first and last time on Triggersoul's 'Restoration.'"

With a sound somewhere between Black Label Society and Pantera, Triggersoul's "Restoration" is a better-than-average debut album that hints at great things that, regrettably, will never come to be.

Shortly after the band scored a record deal, guitar and keyboard player Aaron Roe died, and the band disbanded. Last year, the band elected to release "Restoration" in memory of Roe, and those who like their metal thick n' groovy, with some quieter moments thrown in for variety, will find much to praise here.

The disc starts strong with "Lost Reality," which has singer/guitarist Greg Reeves alternating between melodic vocals and Phil Anselmo-style hardcore shouts in the chorus. The guitar riffing on this song is simple, but strong.

The next track, "Restoration," has an ominous bass line and lyrics that reference Christ on the cross. The solo, though a bit brief, is quite potent.

"Enemy Lines" finds the band in full-on Black Label Society mode, with Reeves sounding eerily like Zakk Wylde during the verses. The band also incorporates a Black Label trick into their repertoire on the next track, "Forgotten," as Roe plays an elegaic piano part.

"Self Destruct" and "Affliction" head back into heavier territory, and then the band unplugs for the beautiful guitar-and-strings ballad "Wasted Years," which is reminiscent of Zakk Wylde's "Book Of Shadows" project. The disc ends on a slightly weak note with "Step Away," which, until an instrumental breakdown near the end, doesn't really take off.

Though the playing is generally excellent, there are moments — especially on "Enemy Lines" and "Self Destruct" — when David Jacobs' drumming feels overly simplistic. It's not enough to wreck the tunes, by any means, but it does prove a bit distracting.

Yes, it's a sad that we won't be hearing more of Aaron Roe's excellent guitar and keyboard work, but it's mostly a joy to hear them for the first and last time on Triggersoul's "Restoration." Fans of Pantera-style grooves and Black Label ballads will enjoy this one.

Highs: "Lost Reality," "Forgotten" and "Wasted Years"

Lows: "Step Away" and some overly simple drumming

Bottom line: A good debut album that hints at the greatness that, sadly, will never come to be.

Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls
3.5 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)