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Madder Mortem - "Where Dream And Day Collide" (CD/EP)

Madder Mortem - "Where Dream And Day Collide" CD/EP cover image

"Where Dream And Day Collide" track listing:

1. Where Dream And Day Collide (Single Version) (3:43)
2. Jitterheart (3:54)
3. The Purest Strain (3:30)
4. Quietude (4:18)
5. Where Dream And Day Collide (Album Version) (5:40)

Reviewed by on May 7, 2010

"With new material and a solid song from “Eight Ways,” the EP will please those who just can’t get enough of Kirkevaag and company."

“Where Dream and Day Collide” is the latest EP from progressive/gothic metal band Madder Mortem. Along with the single and album version of the title song, which is taken from last year’s “Eight Ways,” is three unreleased tracks that show a jazzy, light-hearted side of the band. While their last album touched on an atmospheric progressive sound, the new material has a bouncy feel to it that will get people tapping their feet. These catchy tracks are worth the price alone, though the bland single version of “Where Dream and Day Collide” strips the power out of the original version.

“Jitterheart” and “The Purest Strain” seem to be channeling the swing metal music that Diablo Swing Orchestra is known for. After the restraint that the band showed on “Eight Ways,” it’s nice to see them letting their guard down and having a good time. The aggressive nature of the two songs is a welcoming reprieve from the melancholy dark moods that were crafted on their past few albums.

“Quietude” is a ballad structured in a similar style to past ones from the band. It is slow and melodic, with simplistic instrumental work and haunting vocals from Agnete M. Kirkevaag. Kirkevaag puts in another stellar performance on the EP, with her emotional tones matching well with the somberness of the song. After two up-tempo tracks, the placement of “Quietude” is perfect and wouldn’t have sounded out of place on “Eight Ways.”

The two versions of “Where Dream and Day Collide” are fine, but as is the case with most single versions, the original is far better. The single cuts almost two minutes off the original, taking away the atmospheric touches that stood out on the original. It isn’t a deal-breaker, especially since there are three new tracks to whet the appetite of fans, but it is assumed that most will lean towards the original more than the shortened single.

“Where Dream and Day Collide” is an EP for the hardcore fans of Madder Mortem. With new material and a solid song from “Eight Ways,” the EP will please those who just can’t get enough of Kirkevaag and company. It’s not an essential release to pick up, especially since there really is only ten minutes of worthwhile material to be found. Those who are looking to get into Madder Mortem are better off starting with “Eight Ways.”

Highs: Bouncy, light-hearted feel to the unreleased tracks, "Where Dream And Day Collide" is a strong track from "Eight Ways."

Lows: Lame single version of "Where Dream And Day Collide," purely for the die-hards who can't get enough of Madder Mortem.

Bottom line: An EP for the die-hards that features three new tracks and two versions of "Where Dream And Day Collide."

Rated 3.0 out of 5 skulls
3.0 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)