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Man Must Die - "No Tolerance For Imperfection" (CD)

Man Must Die - "No Tolerance For Imperfection" CD cover image

"No Tolerance For Imperfection" track listing:

1. No Tolerance For Imperfection (4:39)
2. Gainsayer (4:54)
3. Kill It Skin It Wear It (4:18)
4. It Comes In Threes (5:05)
5. This Day Is Black (4:38)
6. Hide The Knives (4:33)
7. Dead In The Water (4:40)
8. What I Can't Take Back (3:33)
9. Reflections From Within (6:06)
10. How The Mighty Have Fallen (5:18)
11. Survival Of The Sickest (2:45)

Reviewed by on October 22, 2009

"“No Tolerance for Imperfection” is a very well executed, tightly played album that suffers from flaws that take it from good to decent."

I’m not sure if it’s just because these guys are from Glasgow, Scotland, but Man Must Die is a very angry band. “No Tolerance for Imperfection” is their latest album, a brutal, high speed assault on the ears that rarely lets up. But this brutality doesn’t do much for the tech death genre and tends to get repetitive, especially near the end of the album.

The album starts out aggressive with the title track. This is probably the least tech-y sounding track on the album, as the song is mainly comprised of down-tuned chugging and sudden aggressive blasts. The rest of the album utilizes more tech-y riffing with songs like “Gainsayer” and “Hide The Knives,” but let me be clear; when it comes to tech death, Man Must Die is obviously not trying to be the most technical band out there. This is seen the most in the fact that on nearly every song, the band incorporates some very melodic guitar work that isn’t particularly technical, yet really adds some emotion and power to the brutality in a very different and unexpected way.

The biggest issue I have with this album is that is gets very repetitive. The choruses can be catchy, but seem overused in some songs (especially on “Dead In The Water,” where I counted 8 choruses in four and a half minutes). The drums consist mainly of blast beats, and when fills are added, they’re usually short, quick drum rolls. The snare tends to sound rather ticky at times; in some rolls, I wasn’t quite convinced that it wasn’t a drum machine.

Some of the songs can go on long and seem to be a little lost. The best example of this is “Hide the Knives.” The track uses a rather repetitive riff that slows down to a very powerful melodic section. This would be a perfect ending, but continues with the same riff as before for another short, pointless section of blasting. It doesn’t do anything for the song and comes across as sounding desperate.

“No Tolerance for Imperfection” is a very well executed, tightly played album that suffers from flaws that take it from good to decent. The melody thrown in was a brilliant move (especially on the last song, which is a crushing, beautiful song), but the fact that the song structure gets lost at times really tends to negate the effect. I would recommend this album to someone who is looking for a quick dose of brutality, as this album is tough to listen to all the way through in one sitting.

Highs: Well played album that infuses brutality with melody.

Lows: Tends to be repetitive; songs get lost in the shuffle.

Bottom line: Good for fans of brutal, aggressive music, but hard to listen through in one sitting.

Rated 3.0 out of 5 skulls
3.0 out of 5 skulls


Key
Rating Description
Rated 5 out of 5 skulls Perfection. (No discernable flaws; one of the reviewer's all-time favorites)
Rated 4.5 out of 5 skulls Near Perfection. (An instant classic with some minor imperfections)
Rated 4 out of 5 skulls Excellent. (An excellent effort worth picking up)
Rated 3.5 out of 5 skulls Good. (A good effort, worth checking out or picking up)
Rated 3 out of 5 skulls Decent. (A decent effort worth checking out if the style fits your tastes)
Rated 2.5 out of 5 skulls Average. (Nothing special; worth checking out if the style fits your taste)
Rated 2 out of 5 skulls Fair. (There is better metal out there)
< 2 skulls Pretty Bad. (Don't bother)