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Dillinger Escape Plan Signs To Season Of Mist Records

Dillinger Escape Plan has announced that they have terminated their contract with Relapse Records and will now be working on the Season Of Mist label instead. A statement from guitarist Ben Weinman reads:

"It is becoming clear that as the music industry standard continues to morph and change on a daily basis, artistic and operational freedom has become a band’s most valuable asset. 100% free of all previous contractual ties, Dillinger is in an amazing position to collaborate with some interesting partners which will continue to nurture the ethic that we have been doing our best to stay true to for over 10 years now. While touring Europe in support of our record, Ire Works, I had the pleasure of meeting Michael Berberian, distributor and owner of the independent record label Season of Mist. It quickly became clear that we had very similar ideas about Dillinger’s music and its place in the underground. Season of Mist has always been a leader in releasing some of the most extreme and interesting metal and experimental music. We look forward to releasing our next full length effort in association with Season of Mist as the very first chapter of this new journey. Also, Michael’s last name almost spells out Barbarian which Greg was really excited about."

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6 Comments on "Dillinger Escape Plan Signs To Season Of Mist"

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jenn-paranoia's avatar

Member

1. jenn-paranoia writes:

alot of bands are breaking up by record companies, and alot of these bands have been together for at least 5 years at most. but its really messd up how the record compnay takes all of the revenue and profit that the band makes and the band only makes like maybe 2 cents a record? but good for them if they feel they could be on there own \jenn/

# May 28, 2009 @ 11:46 AM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Necropolis's avatar

Member

2. Necropolis writes:

My comments will not be directed towards you jenn, but they are in referrence to "its really messd up how the record compnay takes all of the revenue and profit that the band makes".

I see a lot of comments on here about the frustration of record companies so pardon me while I step up on my soap box. The recording industry is a pretty risky and heavily cash influenced industry. The record companies float bands and recording artists cash to record, produce, and tour. This costs a significant amount of money and risk. If the artist does not sell as much as they borrowed from the company, then the company is now out money. Therefore, companies will layer their contracts to hedge against this risk. As a recording artist, you sign a contract, you should be aware that this company is giving you a good faith backing. If you can't hold up your end of the bargain then you may have pressures to succeed. A record company throws around a lot of money and so to keep being profitable they will give bands pressure to make money. It shouldn't be a surprise.

Where the recording industry is failing is much like the newspaper industry. The digital age is far evolving and the recording and newspaper industries business models are becoming more and more prehistoric. Without a significant change, there will be more and more pressure on the existing bands to perform and yes, less and less cash in hand. If you think of how much money it costs to record and then figure how much risk the recording companies are putting out because they have more than one band signed, they have a lot of risk in a lot of places. I don't think its unreasonable the contracts they negotiate because it is not all profit for them. Most of the time they are trying to recoup their money. This is similar to the oil industries. They are not as "profitable (after taxes and expenses, look at their 10K and look at their margins. You would see that they have horrible margins compared to most other industries). If they were as profitable as we would think, then they would be larger companies than they actually are.

I think it all comes down to a significant change is needed in the business model to help drive a more profitable company, but until then this will continue to be the norm.

I don't think it should be a surprise that the recording companies are getting most of the profits as they are the one taking the largest risks. If bands wanted to make more money, then they should take out a loan from a bank to record. They may find that they are getting a better deal from the recording industry.

# May 28, 2009 @ 1:26 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Diamond Oz's avatar

Senior News Correspondent

3. Diamond Oz writes:

Agreed with Necropolis.

# May 28, 2009 @ 1:58 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
deathbringer's avatar

Founder, owner & programmer

4. deathbringer writes:

Well I agree in some regards, but it also has to be put in perspective. A lot of metal bands were burned by big labels who didn't back them with marketing dollars either (re: "you should be aware that this company is giving you a good faith backing"). There are a number of things that bands look for in a label and with the changing landscape due to the internet, it should be no surprise that artists are unhappy with what labels provide. Of course when the label owns all the rights and the band is getting only a small percent (usually smaller than the regular percentage) of the deal's second and third hand digital distro deals that the label makes with other services, the band really isn't getting their fair cut any more. I've seen how these deals work in other industries too and have to side with the artist. Sure, the labels have to recoop their investments, but you can see from how they are dealing with the bigger bands in dipping into their touring and merch that they are interested in more than just that. Yes, that's business, but it's akin to tightening their grip rather than truly adapting, and that's what makes these labels seem so despicable, IMO.

# May 28, 2009 @ 4:44 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
Necropolis's avatar

Member

5. Necropolis writes:

DB,

Well put. You hit it best with "it's akin to tightening their grip rather than truly adapting, and that's what makes these labels seem so despicable". I will agree that it is ugly, but from a business standpoint, they are left with no choice as there is less and less money coming in. This is primarily their own fault however, as they are going down the path that the newspaper industry is of a failure to adapt a new business model.

I believe I was trying to point out that the recording industry is under a lot of pressure to succeed and sometimes that doesn't always work out.

# May 28, 2009 @ 7:05 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address
deathfreak's avatar

Member

6. deathfreak writes:

If your signed thats a good thing. A band should also know what the hell they are getting in to before they sign.

# May 28, 2009 @ 9:15 PM ET | IP Logged Reveal posts originating from the same IP address

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